Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 184

THE ADMINISTRATION

sion. But they have not been restricted to a service which is departmentally organised. The Forestry Commission has suffered in the same way.(1) So, it is claimed by some, has the B.B.C. The Central Electricity Board has consciously avoided a Treasury guarantee for its loans out of fear of the effects of Treasury control, and it has probably had to pay in higher interest rates for that freedom.(2) There is not yet in this country any conscious central planning of the finances of the socialised services by a percentage allocation of profits between such varying demands as expansion, payment of special initiative, technical education, the development of cognate industries, improving workers' conditions, and Treasury needs, such as has been found necessary in Russia. The nearest approach to it is found in the provision contained in the Finance Act, 1933, whereby the Post Office now makes a fixed contribution to the Treasury, and is at liberty to use the surplus for internal needs.
Nor is there as yet any co-ordination of such utilities by a Minister of Economic Affairs. With each additional utility taken over or created such a ministry becomes more imperative.
It must be pointed out that the arguments for semi-independence used here apply only to commissions which control public enterprises or regulate privately owned ones. But they have been used by analogy to explain the creation of the Unemployment Assistance Board and the Unemployment Insurance Statutory Committee. This is hardly a comparable case, for here we have, not the control of a utility requiring initiative, but the administration according to principles of

1 See J. Parker's Chapter III in Public Enterprise, also p. 384.
2 Ibid., Chapter V.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE sion. But they have not been restricted to a service which is departmentally organised. what is Forestry Commission has suffered in what is same way.(1) So, it is claimed by some, has what is B.B.C. what is Central Electricity Board has consciously avoided a Treasury guarantee for its loans out of fear of what is effects of Treasury control, and it has probably had to pay in higher interest rates for that freedom.(2) There is not yet in this country any conscious central planning of what is finances of what is socialised services by a percentage allocation of profits between such varying demands as expansion, payment of special initiative, technical education, what is development of cognate industries, improving workers' conditions, and Treasury needs, such as has been found necessary in Russia. what is nearest approach to it is found in what is provision contained in what is Finance Act, 1933, whereby what is Post Office now makes a fixed contribution to what is Treasury, and is at liberty to use what is surplus for internal needs. Nor is there as yet any co-ordination of such utilities by a Minister of Economic Affairs. With each additional utility taken over or created such a ministry becomes more imperative. It must be pointed out that what is arguments for semi-independence used here apply only to commissions which control public enterprises or regulate privately owned ones. But they have been used by analogy to explain what is creation of what is Unemployment Assistance Board and what is Unemployment Insurance Statutory Committee. This is hardly a comparable case, for here we have, not what is control of a utility requiring initiative, but what is administration according to principles of 1 See J. Parker's Chapter III in Public Enterprise, also p. 384. 2 Ibid., Chapter V. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 184 where is strong THE ADMINISTRATION where is p align="justify" sion. But they have not been restricted to a service which is departmentally organised. what is Forestry Commission has suffered in what is same way.(1) So, it is claimed by some, has the B.B.C. what is Central Electricity Board has consciously avoided a Treasury guarantee for its loans out of fear of what is effects of Treasury control, and it has probably had to pay in higher interest rates for that freedom.(2) There is not yet in this country any conscious central planning of what is finances of what is socialised services by a percentage allocation of profits between such varying demands as expansion, payment of special initiative, technical education, what is development of cognate industries, improving workers' conditions, and Treasury needs, such as has been found necessary in Russia. what is nearest approach to it is found in what is provision contained in what is Finance Act, 1933, whereby what is Post Office now makes a fixed contribution to what is Treasury, and is at liberty to use what is surplus for internal needs. Nor is there as yet any co-ordination of such utilities by a Minister of Economic Affairs. With each additional utility taken over or created such a ministry becomes more imperative. It must be pointed out that what is arguments for semi-independence used here apply only to commissions which control public enterprises or regulate privately owned ones. But they have been used by analogy to explain what is creation of what is Unemployment Assistance Board and what is Unemployment Insurance Statutory Committee. This is hardly a comparable case, for here we have, not what is control of a utility requiring initiative, but what is administration according to principles of 1 See J. Parker's Chapter III in Public Enterprise, also p. 384. 2 Ibid., Chapter V. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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