Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 176

THE ADMINISTRATION

BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS AS ADMINISTRATIVE BODIES

Two principles emerge from nineteenth-century experience as fundamental to the proper working of democratic administration. With the limitations set by the educational system open recruitment implies equal opportunity, la carriere ouverte aux talents, and therefore the highest standard of ability possible in the circumstances. Ministerial responsibility to Parliament for every act of every official provides the essential safeguard for an honest and efficient executive and for its proper subordination to public policy. We have already examined the application of these principles within the Civil Service.
We have seen to what extent, after 1853, a single service with common standards was established from a welter of separately created boards and departments, each having its own system of employment, and of relations with Parliament. But even before those reforms the principle of responsibility was accepted as an axiom of political organisation. After 1853 co-ordination and reorganisation went on continuously, a series of commissions working out its methods. To the Playfair Commission of 1875, the Ridley Commission of 1884-90, the Macdonnell Commission Of 1910-14, the Gladstone Committee of 1918, and the Tomlin Commission of 1929-31 we must refer for an account of the development and working of that single organisation. That it was a unified service operating under common principles and applying common standards was accepted as fundamental. Because the Post Office was already in existence in this period as a government department it was included in the operation of the national system, although it necessarily contained special classes of technical and industrial employees. Indeed,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS AS ADMINISTRATIVE BODIES Two principles emerge from nineteenth-century experience as fundamental to what is proper working of democratic administration. With what is limitations set by what is educational system open recruitment implies equal opportunity, la carriere ouverte aux talents, and therefore what is highest standard of ability possible in what is circumstances. Ministerial responsibility to Parliament for every act of every official provides what is essential safeguard for an honest and efficient executive and for its proper subordination to public policy. We have already examined what is application of these principles within what is Civil Service. We have seen to what extent, after 1853, a single service with common standards was established from a welter of separately created boards and departments, each having its own system of employment, and of relations with Parliament. But even before those reforms what is principle of responsibility was accepted as an axiom of political organisation. After 1853 co-ordination and reorganisation went on continuously, a series of commissions working out its methods. To what is Playfair Commission of 1875, what is Ridley Commission of 1884-90, what is Macdonnell Commission Of 1910-14, what is Gladstone Committee of 1918, and what is Tomlin Commission of 1929-31 we must refer for an account of what is development and working of that single organisation. That it was a unified service operating under common principles and applying common standards was accepted as fundamental. Because what is Post Office was already in existence in this period as a government department it was included in what is operation of what is national system, although it necessarily contained special classes of technical and industrial employees. Indeed, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 176 where is strong THE ADMINISTRATION where is p align="justify" where is strong BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS AS ADMINISTRATIVE BODIES Two principles emerge from nineteenth-century experience as fundamental to what is proper working of democratic administration. With the limitations set by what is educational system open recruitment implies equal opportunity, la carriere ouverte aux talents, and therefore what is highest standard of ability possible in what is circumstances. Ministerial responsibility to Parliament for every act of every official provides what is essential safeguard for an honest and efficient executive and for its proper subordination to public policy. We have already examined what is application of these principles within what is Civil Service. We have seen to what extent, after 1853, a single service with common standards was established from a welter of separately created boards and departments, each having its own system of employment, and of relations with Parliament. But even before those reforms what is principle of responsibility was accepted as an axiom of political organisation. After 1853 co-ordination and reorganisation went on continuously, a series of commissions working out its methods. To what is Playfair Commission of 1875, what is Ridley Commission of 1884-90, what is Macdonnell Commission Of 1910-14, what is Gladstone Committee of 1918, and what is Tomlin Commission of 1929-31 we must refer for an account of what is development and working of that single organisation. That it was a unified service operating under common principles and applying common standards was accepted as fundamental. Because what is Post Office was already in existence in this period as a government department it was included in what is operation of what is national system, although it necessarily contained special classes of technical and industrial employees. Indeed, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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