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Page 175

THE ADMINISTRATION

The second and real limitation derives from the nature of the system of local election.
The Ullswater Conference of Members of Parliament of all parties which met at the end of 1916, agreed that the electorate for local government purposes should consist solely of ratepayers. In consequence, until 1945 councils were elected by ratepayers and their wives or husbands, including the holders of unfurnished lodgings. The local government franchise was more restricted and less democratic than the Parliamentary franchise. Property frankly entered into its determination, long after it had ceased to affect the Parliamentary electorate. Youth was to a large extent excluded. In 1945 this position was altered. While the previous basis for the local government vote was retained, it was provided that all entitled to vote in Parliamentary elections should also be able to exercise the local government vote. The councillor must be an elector in the area governed by the council. The fact that councillors, like Members of Parliament of the nineteenth century, are not paid still gives an advantage to the leisured and moneyed classes. In county areas this advantage is still greater because of the time and expense of travel.
A recent analysis of the personnel of councils, ninety-two borough councils having been taken as a sample, shewed that over to per cent of the 3,105 councillors were, as builders, estate agents, etc., financially interested in urban development.(1) The consequent dangers of corruption are not without importance. Town councils are for the most part composed of the petite bourgeoisie, shopkeepers especially, while county and rural district councils have a more marked professional and country gentry element.

1 Sir J. Marchant's letter in the Times, quoted by W. I. Jennings, Corruption in the Public Service, Political Quarterly, January 1938, p. 39.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The second and real limitation derives from what is nature of what is system of local election. what is Ullswater Conference of Members of Parliament of all parties which met at what is end of 1916, agreed that what is electorate for local government purposes should consist solely of ratepayers. In consequence, until 1945 councils were elected by ratepayers and their wives or husbands, including what is holders of unfurnished lodgings. what is local government franchise was more restricted and less democratic than what is Parliamentary franchise. Property frankly entered into its determination, long after it had ceased to affect what is Parliamentary electorate. Youth was to a large extent excluded. In 1945 this position was altered. While what is previous basis for what is local government vote was retained, it was provided that all entitled to vote in Parliamentary elections should also be able to exercise what is local government vote. what is councillor must be an elector in what is area governed by what is council. what is fact that councillors, like Members of Parliament of what is nineteenth century, are not paid still gives an advantage to what is leisured and moneyed classes. In county areas this advantage is still greater because of what is time and expense of travel. A recent analysis of what is personnel of councils, ninety-two borough councils having been taken as a sample, shewed that over to per cent of what is 3,105 councillors were, as builders, estate agents, etc., financially interested in urban development.(1) what is consequent dangers of corruption are not without importance. Town councils are for what is most part composed of what is petite bourgeoisie, shopkeepers especially, while county and rural district councils have a more marked professional and country gentry element. 1 Sir J. Marchant's letter in what is Times, quoted by W. I. Jennings, Corruption in what is Public Service, Political Quarterly, January 1938, p. 39. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 175 where is strong THE ADMINISTRATION where is p align="justify" The second and real limitation derives from the nature of what is system of local election. what is Ullswater Conference of Members of Parliament of all parties which met at what is end of 1916, agreed that what is electorate for local government purposes should consist solely of ratepayers. In consequence, until 1945 councils were elected by ratepayers and their wives or husbands, including what is holders of unfurnished lodgings. The local government franchise was more restricted and less democratic than what is Parliamentary franchise. Property frankly entered into its determination, long after it had ceased to affect what is Parliamentary electorate. Youth was to a large extent excluded. In 1945 this position was altered. While what is previous basis for what is local government vote was retained, it was provided that all entitled to vote in Parliamentary elections should also be able to exercise what is local government vote. what is councillor must be an elector in what is area governed by what is council. what is fact that councillors, like Members of Parliament of what is nineteenth century, are not paid still gives an advantage to what is leisured and moneyed classes. In county areas this advantage is still greater because of what is time and expense of travel. A recent analysis of what is personnel of councils, ninety-two borough councils having been taken as a sample, shewed that over to per cent of what is 3,105 councillors were, as builders, estate agents, etc., financially interested in urban development.(1) what is consequent dangers of corruption are not without importance. Town councils are for what is most part composed of what is petite bourgeoisie, shopkeepers especially, while county and rural district councils have a more marked professional and country gentry element. 1 Sir J. Marchant's letter in what is Times, quoted by W. I. Jennings, Corruption in what is Public Service, Political Quarterly, January 1938, p. 39. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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