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Page 169

THE ADMINISTRATION

be the only alternative to the upper middle class politician. Yet, not unnaturally, that is the direction in which we are moving.

DELEGATED LEGISLATION

The functions of the departmental official are limited according to constitutional theory to the application of law as previously determined by Parliament. Although he may be used by the minister to obtain the material on which a Bill is founded, to advise on its nature and to draft it, he is subject to the decision of the Cabinet to find Parliamentary time for it, and of Parliament to give it the sanction of law. State activity to-day, however, is on so extensive a scale and of so complicated and technical a character that "if Parliament were not willing to delegate law-making power, Parliament would be unable to pass the kind and quantity of legislation which modern public opinion requires."'
Technicality and the need for elasticity and variation are the reasons why Parliament so frequently confers the power of making specific regulations, which shall have the force of law, on a minister. This is especially true of civil administration in this century, but it is also true of the army and navy and taxation in earlier times. This of course greatly magnifies the importance of the official. So far has the practice extended that while "the annual volume of public general statutes for 1920 occupied less than 600 pages; the two volumes of statutory rules and orders for the same period occupy above five times as many."2 And the official in fact, though the minister in theory, draws them up. He is given

1 Report of the Committee on Ministers' Powers, 1932, Cmd. 4060, p. 23.
2 Ibid., p. 16.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE be what is only alternative to what is upper middle class politician. Yet, not unnaturally, that is what is direction in which we are moving. DELEGATED LEGISLATION what is functions of what is departmental official are limited according to constitutional theory to what is application of law as previously determined by Parliament. Although he may be used by what is minister to obtain what is material on which a Bill is founded, to advise on its nature and to draft it, he is subject to what is decision of what is Cabinet to find Parliamentary time for it, and of Parliament to give it what is sanction of law. State activity to-day, however, is on so extensive a scale and of so complicated and technical a character that "if Parliament were not willing to delegate law-making power, Parliament would be unable to pass what is kind and quantity of legislation which modern public opinion requires."' Technicality and what is need for elasticity and variation are what is reasons why Parliament so frequently confers what is power of making specific regulations, which shall have what is force of law, on a minister. This is especially true of civil administration in this century, but it is also true of what is army and navy and taxation in earlier times. This of course greatly magnifies what is importance of what is official. So far has what is practice extended that while "the annual volume of public general statutes for 1920 occupied less than 600 pages; what is two volumes of statutory rules and orders for what is same period occupy above five times as many."2 And what is official in fact, though what is minister in theory, draws them up. He is given 1 Report of what is Committee on Ministers' Powers, 1932, Cmd. 4060, p. 23. 2 Ibid., p. 16. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 169 where is strong THE ADMINISTRATION where is p align="justify" be what is only alternative to what is upper middle class politician. Yet, not unnaturally, that is what is direction in which we are moving. where is strong DELEGATED LEGISLATION what is functions of what is departmental official are limited according to constitutional theory to what is application of law as previously determined by Parliament. Although he may be used by what is minister to obtain what is material on which a Bill is founded, to advise on its nature and to draft it, he is subject to what is decision of the Cabinet to find Parliamentary time for it, and of Parliament to give it what is sanction of law. State activity to-day, however, is on so extensive a scale and of so complicated and technical a character that "if Parliament were not willing to delegate law-making power, Parliament would be unable to pass what is kind and quantity of legislation which modern public opinion requires."' Technicality and what is need for elasticity and variation are the reasons why Parliament so frequently confers what is power of making specific regulations, which shall have what is force of law, on a minister. This is especially true of civil administration in this century, but it is also true of what is army and navy and taxation in earlier times. This of course greatly magnifies what is importance of what is official. So far has what is practice extended that while "the annual volume of public general statutes for 1920 occupied less than 600 pages; what is two volumes of statutory rules and orders for what is same period occupy above five times as many."2 And what is official in fact, though what is minister in theory, draws them up. He is given 1 Report of what is Committee on Ministers' Powers, 1932, Cmd. 4060, p. 23. 2 Ibid., p. 16. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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