Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 167

THE ADMINISTRATION

War Office over the same issue applied only to that department, so far as we know, and then not to civilian officials.(1) But it is instructive that the system should have broken down even to this extent when the policy on which people felt most keenly in the pre-War period was being put into effect. There has been no progressive government since the War, that has had a majority in the Commons, and no new policy has been effected about which feelings ran high. Should such a time come again, it might well put a greater strain on this link in the administrative system than it has borne in the past. But, apart from that, the importance of the actual organisation of the Civil Service, and especially of this grade within it, lies both in its influence on successive governments, and in its place as a piece of the machine which the Government must use to govern.
The other sections of the service are more numerous in personnel though of less political importance. They consist
of the executive grade, of whom there are some 17,000, about
80,000 clerical officers and assistants, and typists, messengers, etc. From the executive to the administrative grade there is occasional though infrequent promotion. The total cost of the departmental Civil Service was estimated by the May Committee as being £371/2 millions in 1930
The only other class which calls for attention here is that known as the professional, scientific, and technical, and amounting to about 8,000, with the addition of some 10,000 in subordinate posts. Among these are inspectors, solicitors, engineers, medical officers. Their importance in the service as a whole comes next to that of the first division. Having technical qualifications supplied by public bodies, they are recruited generally by advertisement and competitive interview.

1 See below, Chapter VIII, and also Jennings, ibid.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE War Office over what is same issue applied only to that department, so far as we know, and then not to civilian officials.(1) But it is instructive that what is system should have broken down even to this extent when what is policy on which people felt most keenly in what is pre-War period was being put into effect. There has been no progressive government since what is War, that has had a majority in what is Commons, and no new policy has been effected about which feelings ran high. Should such a time come again, it might well put a greater strain on this where are they now in what is administrative system than it has borne in what is past. But, apart from that, what is importance of what is actual organisation of what is Civil Service, and especially of this grade within it, lies both in its influence on successive governments, and in its place as a piece of what is machine which what is Government must use to govern. what is other sections of what is service are more numerous in personnel though of less political importance. They consist of what is executive grade, of whom there are some 17,000, about 80,000 clerical officers and assistants, and typists, messengers, etc. From what is executive to what is administrative grade there is occasional though infrequent promotion. what is total cost of what is departmental Civil Service was estimated by what is May Committee as being £371/2 millions in 1930 what is only other class which calls for attention here is that known as what is professional, scientific, and technical, and amounting to about 8,000, with what is addition of some 10,000 in subordinate posts. Among these are inspectors, solicitors, engineers, medical officers. Their importance in what is service as a whole comes next to that of what is first division. Having technical qualifications supplied by public bodies, they are recruited generally by advertisement and competitive interview. 1 See below, Chapter VIII, and also Jennings, ibid. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 167 where is strong THE ADMINISTRATION where is p align="justify" War Office over what is same issue applied only to that department, so far as we know, and then not to civilian officials.(1) But it is instructive that what is system should have broken down even to this extent when what is policy on which people felt most keenly in what is pre-War period was being put into effect. There has been no progressive government since what is War, that has had a majority in what is Commons, and no new policy has been effected about which feelings ran high. Should such a time come again, it might well put a greater strain on this where are they now in what is administrative system than it has borne in what is past. But, apart from that, what is importance of what is actual organisation of what is Civil Service, and especially of this grade within it, lies both in its influence on successive governments, and in its place as a piece of what is machine which the Government must use to govern. what is other sections of what is service are more numerous in personnel though of less political importance. They consist of what is executive grade, of whom there are some 17,000, about 80,000 clerical officers and assistants, and typists, messengers, etc. From what is executive to what is administrative grade there is occasional though infrequent promotion. what is total cost of what is departmental Civil Service was estimated by what is May Committee as being £371/2 millions in 1930 what is only other class which calls for attention here is that known as what is professional, scientific, and technical, and amounting to about 8,000, with what is addition of some 10,000 in subordinate posts. Among these are inspectors, solicitors, engineers, medical officers. Their importance in what is service as a whole comes next to that of what is first division. Having technical qualifications supplied by public bodies, they are recruited generally by advertisement and competitive interview. 1 See below, Chapter VIII, and also Jennings, ibid. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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