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Page 166

THE ADMINISTRATION

the minister. It is his duty to shew the alternative courses possible and their consequences. When the minister himself has an already clearly framed policy the official must work out the manner of its application. Clearly, therefore, this class of official is in the most influential and responsible position. In default of a ministerial policy it is his that counts. In any case his views are apt to modify the policies of even quite clear and determined ministers. It is highly necessary to harmonious administration that he should speak the same language and have the same general order of ideas as his political chiefs, that he should meet them socially, for it is often such informal meeting that provides the best basis for mutual understanding. This has been admirably secured in the past, but the advent of a different class of politician to office makes different qualifications desirable if the administration is to work with the same degree of efficiency. Already there is some evidence that the traditional manner may have a bad effect, either by overawing and causing administration without a proper political direction, or by producing an atmosphere of disharmony in which government cannot be efficiently carried on. If it was necessary in the nineteenth century that officials should have the same background and upbringing as ministers, so is it in the twentieth. Fortunately this difficulty shews signs of being mitigated by the development of progressive thought in the older universities and public schools, and there is little evidence of complaint by ministers of intrigue or dishonesty on the part of officials. The constraint that developed between the Permanent UnderSecretary at the Foreign Office and Sir Edward Grey because of his government's policy in Ireland(1) is an exception. The disloyalty and conspiracy of officers inside and outside the

1 See W. I. Jennings, Cabinet Government, p. 98.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the minister. It is his duty to shew what is alternative courses possible and their consequences. When what is minister himself has an already clearly framed policy what is official must work out what is manner of its application. Clearly, therefore, this class of official is in what is most influential and responsible position. In default of a ministerial policy it is his that counts. In any case his views are apt to modify what is policies of even quite clear and determined ministers. It is highly necessary to harmonious administration that he should speak what is same language and have what is same general order of ideas as his political chiefs, that he should meet them socially, for it is often such informal meeting that provides what is best basis for mutual understanding. This has been admirably secured in what is past, but what is advent of a different class of politician to office makes different qualifications desirable if what is administration is to work with what is same degree of efficiency. Already there is some evidence that what is traditional manner may have a bad effect, either by overawing and causing administration without a proper political direction, or by producing an atmosphere of disharmony in which government cannot be efficiently carried on. If it was necessary in what is nineteenth century that officials should have what is same background and upbringing as ministers, so is it in what is twentieth. Fortunately this difficulty shews signs of being mitigated by what is development of progressive thought in what is older universities and public schools, and there is little evidence of complaint by ministers of intrigue or dishonesty on what is part of officials. what is constraint that developed between what is Permanent UnderSecretary at what is Foreign Office and Sir Edward Grey because of his government's policy in Ireland(1) is an exception. what is disloyalty and conspiracy of officers inside and outside what is 1 See W. I. Jennings, Cabinet Government, p. 98. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 166 where is strong THE ADMINISTRATION where is p align="justify" the minister. It is his duty to shew what is alternative courses possible and their consequences. When what is minister himself has an already clearly framed policy what is official must work out what is manner of its application. Clearly, therefore, this class of official is in what is most influential and responsible position. In default of a ministerial policy it is his that counts. In any case his views are apt to modify what is policies of even quite clear and determined ministers. It is highly necessary to harmonious administration that he should speak what is same language and have what is same general order of ideas as his political chiefs, that he should meet them socially, for it is often such informal meeting that provides the best basis for mutual understanding. This has been admirably secured in what is past, but what is advent of a different class of politician to office makes different qualifications desirable if what is administration is to work with what is same degree of efficiency. Already there is some evidence that what is traditional manner may have a bad effect, either by overawing and causing administration without a proper political direction, or by producing an atmosphere of disharmony in which government cannot be efficiently carried on. If it was necessary in what is nineteenth century that officials should have what is same background and upbringing as ministers, so is it in the twentieth. Fortunately this difficulty shews signs of being mitigated by what is development of progressive thought in what is older universities and public schools, and there is little evidence of complaint by ministers of intrigue or dishonesty on what is part of officials. The constraint that developed between what is Permanent UnderSecretary at what is Foreign Office and Sir Edward Grey because of his government's policy in Ireland(1) is an exception. what is disloyalty and conspiracy of officers inside and outside what is 1 See W. I. Jennings, Cabinet Government, p. 98. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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