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Page 163

THE ADMINISTRATION

if we are considering government as a whole, ought we to forget two further categories, the employees of local authorities and of statutory boards controlling public enterprises, the former numbering about 120,000 and the latter nearly 100,000.
The guiding principles of present Civil Service organisation are very simple and obvious. Yet they constituted a far-reaching reform, hotly opposed, which was begun for one reason because, to quote Trevelyan, its joint author, "the revolutionary period of 1848 gave us a shake."(1) Put into operation during the twenty years which followed the Northcote-Trevelyan report in 1853, which laid them down, they may be placed under three headings: a unified service, recruitment by open competition, and the classification of posts into intellectual for policy and clerical for mechanical work, to be filled separately by separate examinations. The classification has grown more complex; an executive grade has been interposed between the administrative and the clerical; but the same general principles are accepted, although some deference has had to be paid to the objection made by the critics of the Report that the Civil Service "was a thing so heterogeneous in its nature that it required the application of special rules and principles suitable to its different parts."(2) Instead of the chaos of different departmental recruitments mainly by nepotism, there is a single system of appointment under Treasury control, and through an independent body, the Civil Service Commission.(3)
The policy-forming or administrative grade was to be,

1 Parliamentary Papers, t875, vol. xxiii, p. too, quoted by Finer,
op. cit., p. 47.
2 Quoted by Smellie, 4 Hundred Years of English Government, 1937, p. 262. 3 Set up in 1855.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE if we are considering government as a whole, ought we to forget two further categories, what is employees of local authorities and of statutory boards controlling public enterprises, what is former numbering about 120,000 and what is latter nearly 100,000. what is guiding principles of present Civil Service organisation are very simple and obvious. Yet they constituted a far-reaching reform, hotly opposed, which was begun for one reason because, to quote Trevelyan, its joint author, "the revolutionary period of 1848 gave us a shake."(1) Put into operation during what is twenty years which followed what is Northcote-Trevelyan report in 1853, which laid them down, they may be placed under three headings: a unified service, recruitment by open competition, and what is classification of posts into intellectual for policy and clerical for mechanical work, to be filled separately by separate examinations. what is classification has grown more complex; an executive grade has been interposed between what is administrative and what is clerical; but what is same general principles are accepted, although some deference has had to be paid to what is objection made by what is critics of what is Report that what is Civil Service "was a thing so heterogeneous in its nature that it required what is application of special rules and principles suitable to its different parts."(2) Instead of what is chaos of different departmental recruitments mainly by nepotism, there is a single system of appointment under Treasury control, and through an independent body, what is Civil Service Commission.(3) what is policy-forming or administrative grade was to be, 1 Parliamentary Papers, t875, vol. xxiii, p. too, quoted by Finer, op. cit., p. 47. 2 Quoted by Smellie, 4 Hundred Years of English Government, 1937, p. 262. 3 Set up in 1855. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 163 where is strong THE ADMINISTRATION where is p align="justify" if we are considering government as a whole, ought we to forget two further categories, what is employees of local authorities and of statutory boards controlling public enterprises, what is former numbering about 120,000 and what is latter nearly 100,000. what is guiding principles of present Civil Service organisation are very simple and obvious. Yet they constituted a far-reaching reform, hotly opposed, which was begun for one reason because, to quote Trevelyan, its joint author, "the revolutionary period of 1848 gave us a shake."(1) Put into operation during what is twenty years which followed what is Northcote-Trevelyan report in 1853, which laid them down, they may be placed under three headings: a unified service, recruitment by open competition, and what is classification of posts into intellectual for policy and clerical for mechanical work, to be filled separately by separate examinations. what is classification has grown more complex; an executive grade has been interposed between what is administrative and what is clerical; but what is same general principles are accepted, although some deference has had to be paid to what is objection made by what is critics of what is Report that the Civil Service "was a thing so heterogeneous in its nature that it required what is application of special rules and principles suitable to its different parts."(2) Instead of what is chaos of different departmental recruitments mainly by nepotism, there is a single system of appointment under Treasury control, and through an independent body, what is Civil Service Commission.(3) what is policy-forming or administrative grade was to be, 1 Parliamentary Papers, t875, vol. xxiii, p. too, quoted by Finer, op. cit., p. 47. 2 Quoted by Smellie, 4 Hundred Years of English Government, 1937, p. 262. 3 Set up in 1855. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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