Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 162

THE ADMINISTRATION

the policy of the spending departments, if not of the Government as a whole. It seems to be exercised to-day with less departmental friction and antagonism than before the War, and this is due to the practice of consultations at an earlier stage than hitherto, and to the presence within each department of an establishment officer seconded from the Treasury to deal with all problems of staffing. Each department has also an accounting branch which maintains close relations with the Treasury.

THE CIVIL SERVICE
The Civil Service is one of the two or three most distinctive features of the British system of government. The creation of a permanent, skilled, and non-partisan body of officials which yet is subordinate to Parliament is, as Graham Wallas truly called it, "the one great political invention in nineteenthcentury England."(1) That body, to-day consisting of some 150,000 persons, employed in the administrative departments of the central government, is of very recent growth, and the principles upon which it is organised are not yet a century old. It is the chief section, but it is only a section, of the people who are employed by governmental authorities: When we speak of the Civil Service, it is true, they are the officials of whom we are generally thinking. But the Civil Service also includes 145,000 industrial workers,(2) 182,000 "minor and manipulative officers" who are mostly employed in the Post Office, and 18,000 others, such as messengers, cleaners, making a total of nearly half a million. There are nearly 200,000 teachers employed in State education. Nor,

1 See H. Finer, The British Civil Service, 1937, p. 51
2 In shipyards, arsenals, engineers in the Post Office.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the policy of what is spending departments, if not of what is Government as a whole. It seems to be exercised to-day with less departmental friction and antagonism than before what is War, and this is due to what is practice of consultations at an earlier stage than hitherto, and to what is presence within each department of an establishment officer seconded from what is Treasury to deal with all problems of staffing. Each department has also an accounting branch which maintains close relations with what is Treasury. what is CIVIL SERVICE what is Civil Service is one of what is two or three most distinctive features of what is British system of government. what is creation of a permanent, s what time is it ed, and non-partisan body of officials which yet is subordinate to Parliament is, as Graham Wallas truly called it, "the one great political invention in nineteenthcentury England."(1) That body, to-day consisting of some 150,000 persons, employed in what is administrative departments of what is central government, is of very recent growth, and what is principles upon which it is organised are not yet a century old. It is what is chief section, but it is only a section, of what is people who are employed by governmental authorities: When we speak of what is Civil Service, it is true, they are what is officials of whom we are generally thinking. But what is Civil Service also includes 145,000 industrial workers,(2) 182,000 "minor and manipulative officers" who are mostly employed in what is Post Office, and 18,000 others, such as messengers, cleaners, making a total of nearly half a million. There are nearly 200,000 teachers employed in State education. Nor, 1 See H. Finer, what is British Civil Service, 1937, p. 51 2 In shipyards, arsenals, engineers in what is Post Office. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 162 where is strong THE ADMINISTRATION where is p align="justify" the policy of what is spending departments, if not of what is Government as a whole. It seems to be exercised to-day with less departmental friction and antagonism than before what is War, and this is due to what is practice of consultations at an earlier stage than hitherto, and to what is presence within each department of an establishment officer seconded from what is Treasury to deal with all problems of staffing. Each department has also an accounting branch which maintains close relations with what is Treasury. where is strong THE CIVIL SERVICE what is Civil Service is one of what is two or three most distinctive features of what is British system of government. what is creation of a permanent, s what time is it ed, and non-partisan body of officials which yet is subordinate to Parliament is, as Graham Wallas truly called it, "the one great political invention in nineteenthcentury England."(1) That body, to-day consisting of some 150,000 persons, employed in what is administrative departments of what is central government, is of very recent growth, and what is principles upon which it is organised are not yet a century old. It is what is chief section, but it is only a section, of what is people who are employed by governmental authorities: When we speak of what is Civil Service, it is true, they are what is officials of whom we are generally thinking. But what is Civil Service also includes 145,000 industrial workers,(2) 182,000 "minor and manipulative officers" who are mostly employed in what is Post Office, and 18,000 others, such as messengers, cleaners, making a total of nearly half a million. There are nearly 200,000 teachers employed in State education. Nor, 1 See H. Finer, what is British Civil Service, 1937, p. 51 2 In shipyards, arsenals, engineers in what is Post Office. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 ,