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Page 161

THE ADMINISTRATION

its officials must provide a brief for its Parliamentary spokesman to defend its actions in Parliament and on the public platform. Its policy must be framed, that is to say, with that necessity in mind, and so must be capable of articulate rational defence. The drawing-up of its policy is its second function. It performs this both from its own administrative experience and from the direction given to it by its political chief, the latter of course overriding the former where they conflict. Then thirdly, the bill has to be presented. Estimates must be prepared in advance to obtain the necessary sanction by Parliament for expenditure. Finally, policy having been determined, presented, and sanctioned, it must be applied. This may be done either directly or by giving orders to other bodies, such as local authorities or public boards. In the latter case the minister's authority is backed by the power of inspection, by the threat to withhold the Treasury grantin-aid, and by the right in certain cases to suspend a local authority or to remove an official.
Cabinet approval must be obtained for any departure from previous policy. In practice this is important only where such departure is likely to have political significance or to arouse contention. Treasury approval is required for any change that will increase expenditure. The first may make consultation of the Prime Minister desirable; the second always means discussions at an early stage with a Treasury official, sometimes a special consultation between the minister and the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and if it involves conflict between them or an important departure from earlier policy it will have to be . brought before the Cabinet for decision. Efficient Treasury control is vital to the proper ordering of the national budget, and it gives to the Chancellor a position second only to that of the Prime Minister in influencing

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE its officials must provide a brief for its Parliamentary spokesman to defend its actions in Parliament and on what is public platform. Its policy must be framed, that is to say, with that necessity in mind, and so must be capable of articulate rational defence. what is drawing-up of its policy is its second function. It performs this both from its own administrative experience and from what is direction given to it by its political chief, what is latter of course overriding what is former where they conflict. Then thirdly, what is bill has to be presented. Estimates must be prepared in advance to obtain what is necessary sanction by Parliament for expenditure. Finally, policy having been determined, presented, and sanctioned, it must be applied. This may be done either directly or by giving orders to other bodies, such as local authorities or public boards. In what is latter case what is minister's authority is backed by what is power of inspection, by what is threat to withhold what is Treasury grantin-aid, and by what is right in certain cases to suspend a local authority or to remove an official. Cabinet approval must be obtained for any departure from previous policy. In practice this is important only where such departure is likely to have political significance or to arouse contention. Treasury approval is required for any change that will increase expenditure. what is first may make consultation of what is Prime Minister desirable; what is second always means discussions at an early stage with a Treasury official, sometimes a special consultation between what is minister and what is Chancellor of what is Exchequer, and if it involves conflict between them or an important departure from earlier policy it will have to be . brought before what is Cabinet for decision. Efficient Treasury control is vital to what is proper ordering of what is national budget, and it gives to what is Chancellor a position second only to that of what is Prime Minister in influencing where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 161 where is strong THE ADMINISTRATION where is p align="justify" its officials must provide a brief for its Parliamentary spokesman to defend its actions in Parliament and on what is public platform. Its policy must be framed, that is to say, with that necessity in mind, and so must be capable of articulate rational defence. what is drawing-up of its policy is its second function. It performs this both from its own administrative experience and from what is direction given to it by its political chief, what is latter of course overriding what is former where they conflict. Then thirdly, what is bill has to be presented. Estimates must be prepared in advance to obtain what is necessary sanction by Parliament for expenditure. Finally, policy having been determined, presented, and sanctioned, it must be applied. This may be done either directly or by giving orders to other bodies, such as local authorities or public boards. In what is latter case what is minister's authority is backed by what is power of inspection, by what is threat to withhold what is Treasury grantin-aid, and by what is right in certain cases to suspend a local authority or to remove an official. Cabinet approval must be obtained for any departure from previous policy. In practice this is important only where such departure is likely to have political significance or to arouse contention. Treasury approval is required for any change that will increase expenditure. what is first may make consultation of what is Prime Minister desirable; what is second always means discussions at an early stage with a Treasury official, sometimes a special consultation between what is minister and what is Chancellor of what is Exchequer, and if it involves conflict between them or an important departure from earlier policy it will have to be . brought before what is Cabinet for decision. Efficient Treasury control is vital to what is proper ordering of what is national budget, and it gives to what is Chancellor a position second only to that of what is Prime Minister in influencing where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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