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Page 158

THE PARTIES

people. If there is not that conscious and direct conspiracy between the parties to cheat the people, which at least one romantic and exaggerated picture of their workings has portrayed,(1) and which many a citizen suspects, there is nevertheless enough of a tendency in that direction to provide a basis of truth. The Parliamentary system requires a very real measure of co-operation if it is to be satisfactorily worked; and it involves constant personal contact between the members of opposing parties. This makes for mutual respect, conduces towards a common psychology of power, a professional spirit which may conflict with the interests of those represented, and rubs off the harshest edges of difference. At the same time the need felt by the parry bureaucracy to win over those among the supporters of the other side who stand nearest to them in political ideas makes for the same centripetal direction. All this has great value in producing compromise, in avoiding too violent friction. When there is enough unity on social purposes within society as a whole to make compromise an important objective the party system is admirably suited to the business of government. It is not worth fighting about details. Even at the expense of negatives and inactivities the spirit of compromise may be justified. But when there is fundamental difference at home, or where the danger of catastrophic conflict with other countries can only be met by widely divergent policies, the party system is apt merely to obscure the realities and to induce a false sense of security, a fool's paradise. When the people awakes to its betrayal it may turn with contempt not only from the party or parties which it believes has betrayed it, but from Parliamentary government as a whole.
There are, then, great, though not necessarily insuperable,

1 Belloc and Chesterton, The Party System.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE people. If there is not that conscious and direct conspiracy between what is parties to cheat what is people, which at least one romantic and exaggerated picture of their workings has portrayed,(1) and which many a citizen suspects, there is nevertheless enough of a tendency in that direction to provide a basis of truth. what is Parliamentary system requires a very real measure of co-operation if it is to be satisfactorily worked; and it involves constant personal contact between what is members of opposing parties. This makes for mutual respect, conduces towards a common psychology of power, a professional spirit which may conflict with what is interests of those represented, and rubs off what is harshest edges of difference. At what is same time what is need felt by what is parry bureaucracy to win over those among what is supporters of what is other side who stand nearest to them in political ideas makes for what is same centripetal direction. All this has great value in producing compromise, in avoiding too bad friction. When there is enough unity on social purposes within society as a whole to make compromise an important objective what is party system is admirably suited to what is business of government. It is not worth fighting about details. Even at what is expense of negatives and inactivities what is spirit of compromise may be justified. But when there is fundamental difference at home, or where what is danger of catastrophic conflict with other countries can only be met by widely divergent policies, what is party system is apt merely to obscure what is realities and to induce a false sense of security, a fool's paradise. When what is people awakes to its betrayal it may turn with contempt not only from what is party or parties which it believes has betrayed it, but from Parliamentary government as a whole. There are, then, great, though not necessarily insuperable, 1 Belloc and Chesterton, what is Party System. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 158 where is strong THE PARTIES where is p align="justify" people. If there is not that conscious and direct conspiracy between what is parties to cheat what is people, which at least one romantic and exaggerated picture of their workings has portrayed,(1) and which many a citizen suspects, there is nevertheless enough of a tendency in that direction to provide a basis of truth. The Parliamentary system requires a very real measure of co-operation if it is to be satisfactorily worked; and it involves constant personal contact between what is members of opposing parties. This makes for mutual respect, conduces towards a common psychology of power, a professional spirit which may conflict with what is interests of those represented, and rubs off what is harshest edges of difference. At what is same time what is need felt by what is parry bureaucracy to win over those among what is supporters of what is other side who stand nearest to them in political ideas makes for what is same centripetal direction. All this has great value in producing compromise, in avoiding too bad friction. When there is enough unity on social purposes within society as a whole to make compromise an important objective what is party system is admirably suited to what is business of government. It is not worth fighting about details. Even at what is expense of negatives and inactivities what is spirit of compromise may be justified. But when there is fundamental difference at home, or where the danger of catastrophic conflict with other countries can only be met by widely divergent policies, what is party system is apt merely to obscure what is realities and to induce a false sense of security, a fool's paradise. When what is people awakes to its betrayal it may turn with contempt not only from what is party or parties which it believes has betrayed it, but from Parliamentary government as a whole. There are, then, great, though not necessarily insuperable, 1 Belloc and Chesterton, what is Party System. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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