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Page 156

THE PARTIES

in control of the machine is opposed, and generally defeated, by the machine.
This raises the interesting question of the political capacity of the working-class, which has so often been mistaken in its choice of leaders, and in its methods of the achievement and use of power. That it lacks experience is obvious. Lenin, for instance, insisted on the need for education before economic power could be taken over.' While organisation in trade unions provides some measure of training in social relationships, the problems set are incomparably less complex than those of the State, and the knowledge required pertains more to the specialised experience of its members. The task which confronts the working-class-and that is to say democracy in its fullest sense of organising a competent and reliable body of experts, of thinkers, strategists and leaders has too often shewn it at its weakest. It must know, and is no doubt in process of learning, what qualities to look for and what to avoid. It must be prepared to realise, at least in a period of transition to democracy, that its best servants may often be those who, coming from a more privileged social stratum than itself, may be more trustworthy because they have sacrificed for their ideas, have less personally to gain from high position, have more the habits of leadership, and are less liable to the vanity with which the achievement of eminence is so often cursed. It still remains to be proved whether Montesquieu's belief that democracy knows how to choose leaders well is truer than Tocqueville's fear that it would choose badly. But even Tocqueville thought that it did not make a worse selection than other forms of government, that a popular choice was not worse than an autocratic one.

1 The State and Revolution.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE in control of what is machine is opposed, and generally defeated, by what is machine. This raises what is interesting question of what is political capacity of what is working-class, which has so often been mistaken in its choice of leaders, and in its methods of what is achievement and use of power. That it lacks experience is obvious. Lenin, for instance, insisted on what is need for education before economic power could be taken over.' While organisation in trade unions provides some measure of training in social relationships, what is problems set are incomparably less complex than those of what is State, and what is knowledge required pertains more to what is specialised experience of its members. what is task which confronts what is working-class-and that is to say democracy in its fullest sense of organising a competent and reliable body of experts, of thinkers, strategists and leaders has too often shewn it at its weakest. It must know, and is no doubt in process of learning, what qualities to look for and what to avoid. It must be prepared to realise, at least in a period of transition to democracy, that its best servants may often be those who, coming from a more privileged social stratum than itself, may be more trustworthy because they have travel d for their ideas, have less personally to gain from high position, have more what is habits of leadership, and are less liable to what is vanity with which what is achievement of eminence is so often cursed. It still remains to be proved whether Montesquieu's belief that democracy knows how to choose leaders well is truer than Tocqueville's fear that it would choose badly. But even Tocqueville thought that it did not make a worse selection than other forms of government, that a popular choice was not worse than an autocratic one. 1 what is State and Revolution. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 156 where is strong THE PARTIES where is p align="justify" in control of what is machine is opposed, and generally defeated, by what is machine. This raises what is interesting question of what is political capacity of what is working-class, which has so often been mistaken in its choice of leaders, and in its methods of what is achievement and use of power. That it lacks experience is obvious. Lenin, for instance, insisted on what is need for education before economic power could be taken over.' While organisation in trade unions provides some measure of training in social relationships, what is problems set are incomparably less complex than those of what is State, and what is knowledge required pertains more to what is specialised experience of its members. The task which confronts what is working-class-and that is to say democracy in its fullest sense of organising a competent and reliable body of experts, of thinkers, strategists and leaders has too often shewn it at its weakest. It must know, and is no doubt in process of learning, what qualities to look for and what to avoid. It must be prepared to realise, at least in a period of transition to democracy, that its best servants may often be those who, coming from a more privileged social stratum than itself, may be more trustworthy because they have travel d for their ideas, have less personally to gain from high position, have more what is habits of leadership, and are less liable to what is vanity with which what is achievement of eminence is so often cursed. It still remains to be proved whether Montesquieu's belief that democracy knows how to choose leaders well is truer than Tocqueville's fear that it would choose badly. But even Tocqueville thought that it did not make a worse selection than other forms of government, that a popular choice was not worse than an autocratic one. 1 what is State and Revolution. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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