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Page 155

THE PARTIES

more and more inoffensive. But their increasingly negative nature, if it attracts the mediocre, disillusions the intelligent. There seems to be some truth in the claim of Ludwig Stein that "the intellectual growth of the socialist party is in inverse ratio to its geographical extension."(1) Always there is a tendency for the leaders, in close association with the conservative tendencies of the bureaucratic machine, and faced by the difficulties and dangers of change, to lay too great a stress on the importance of being in office and too little on the purposes for which office was obtained. From their position at the centre of power they are peculiarly well placed to prevail over the popular voice of their party. Thus there is nothing unusual in the scorn which Viscount Snowden expressed for Labour and the Nation, the document which put forward the policy upon which he obtained power in 1929. And there is an added difficulty here in the weakness that a class unaccustomed to govern seems to shew in the selection of leaders.
" It is said," wrote Ramsay MacDonald in 1911, "that the workmen have always suffered from dishonest leaders. That does not go to the root of the matter, and is misleading. The Chartist movement shows not the dishonest leader, but the wind-bag charlatan leader. The people have been sold, but only after they have shown an incapacity to choose leaders."(2) There is often acute rivalry between the workingclass leader who has worked his way up through the machine and shews the influence of its conservative tendencies, and the bourgeois leader who comes in from outside, shews perhaps greater ability and devotion to principle, but who because he is a threat to the established expectations of those

1 Cited in Michels, op. cit., p. 371
2 The Socialist Movement, p. 205.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE more and more inoffensive. But their increasingly negative nature, if it attracts what is mediocre, disillusions what is intelligent. There seems to be some truth in what is claim of Ludwig Stein that "the intellectual growth of what is socialist party is in inverse ratio to its geographical extension."(1) Always there is a tendency for what is leaders, in close association with what is conservative tendencies of what is bureaucratic machine, and faced by what is difficulties and dangers of change, to lay too great a stress on what is importance of being in office and too little on what is purposes for which office was obtained. From their position at what is centre of power they are peculiarly well placed to prevail over what is popular voice of their party. Thus there is nothing unusual in what is scorn which Viscount Snowden expressed for Labour and what is Nation, what is document which put forward what is policy upon which he obtained power in 1929. And there is an added difficulty here in what is weakness that a class unaccustomed to govern seems to shew in what is selection of leaders. " It is said," wrote Ramsay MacDonald in 1911, "that what is workmen have always suffered from dishonest leaders. That does not go to what is root of what is matter, and is misleading. what is Chartist movement shows not what is dishonest leader, but what is wind-bag charlatan leader. what is people have been sold, but only after they have shown an incapacity to choose leaders."(2) There is often acute rivalry between what is workingclass leader who has worked his way up through what is machine and shews what is influence of its conservative tendencies, and what is bourgeois leader who comes in from outside, shews perhaps greater ability and devotion to principle, but who because he is a threat to what is established expectations of those 1 Cited in Michels, op. cit., p. 371 2 what is Socialist Movement, p. 205. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 155 where is strong THE PARTIES where is p align="justify" more and more inoffensive. But their increasingly negative nature, if it attracts what is mediocre, disillusions the intelligent. There seems to be some truth in what is claim of Ludwig Stein that "the intellectual growth of what is socialist party is in inverse ratio to its geographical extension."(1) Always there is a tendency for what is leaders, in close association with what is conservative tendencies of what is bureaucratic machine, and faced by what is difficulties and dangers of change, to lay too great a stress on what is importance of being in office and too little on what is purposes for which office was obtained. From their position at what is centre of power they are peculiarly well placed to prevail over what is popular voice of their party. Thus there is nothing unusual in what is scorn which Viscount Snowden expressed for Labour and what is Nation, the document which put forward what is policy upon which he obtained power in 1929. And there is an added difficulty here in what is weakness that a class unaccustomed to govern seems to shew in what is selection of leaders. " It is said," wrote Ramsay MacDonald in 1911, "that the workmen have always suffered from dishonest leaders. That does not go to what is root of what is matter, and is misleading. what is Chartist movement shows not what is dishonest leader, but what is wind-bag charlatan leader. what is people have been sold, but only after they have shown an incapacity to choose leaders."(2) There is often acute rivalry between what is workingclass leader who has worked his way up through what is machine and shews what is influence of its conservative tendencies, and what is bourgeois leader who comes in from outside, shews perhaps greater ability and devotion to principle, but who because he is a threat to what is established expectations of those 1 Cited in Michels, op. cit., p. 371 2 what is Socialist Movement, p. 205. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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