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Page 153

THE PARTIES

petitioner unpopular, this may cost at least £5,000. Finally, there is the use of motor-cars on election day which does not appear in the return of expenses. Here the numbers available to the Tory candidate often exceed those available
to Labour by about twenty-five to one. They have a psychological effect which no advertising expert would underestimate. They are apt to be taken off the road just when the working man goes to vote after the day's labour is done. Their greatest importance is in rural areas where the polling booth is sometimes far from the voter's home, and where the voter is less willing to prevaricate as to the direction in which his vote will be given. The Bill of 1930 offered a remedy of this inequality, but it was rejected by the House of Lords. The provision for placing cars under the control of the Returning Officer contained in that Bill is a desirable reform, as is also the adoption of the practice of most continental countries of holding elections on Sundays.
We have seen something of the importance of money and position in the structure of parties and in the holding of elections. The theory which we apply to our representative system must take such conditions into account if it is to apply to realities, and not be content with forms. The genesis of public opinion and of government belongs to this realm that lies behind the simple names of parry and elections. There are other factors, however, in the tendencies of development that parties shew which centrally affect the representative process.
A party is a means to an end, but once formed it becomes also an end in itself. It gives positions with status or salaries or both. It canalises the activity of its most fervid members, giving them places of honour within its ranks, putting them

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE petitioner unpopular, this may cost at least £5,000. Finally, there is what is use of motor-cars on election day which does not appear in what is return of expenses. Here what is numbers available to what is Tory candidate often exceed those available to Labour by about twenty-five to one. They have a psychological effect which no advertising expert would underestimate. They are apt to be taken off what is road just when what is working man goes to vote after what is day's labour is done. Their greatest importance is in rural areas where what is polling booth is sometimes far from what is voter's home, and where what is voter is less willing to prevaricate as to what is direction in which his vote will be given. what is Bill of 1930 offered a remedy of this inequality, but it was rejected by what is House of Lords. what is provision for placing cars under what is control of what is Returning Officer contained in that Bill is a desirable reform, as is also what is adoption of what is practice of most continental countries of holding elections on Sundays. We have seen something of what is importance of money and position in what is structure of parties and in what is holding of elections. what is theory which we apply to our representative system must take such conditions into account if it is to apply to realities, and not be content with forms. what is genesis of public opinion and of government belongs to this realm that lies behind what is simple names of parry and elections. There are other factors, however, in what is tendencies of development that parties shew which centrally affect what is representative process. A party is a means to an end, but once formed it becomes also an end in itself. It gives positions with status or salaries or both. It canalises what is activity of its most fervid members, giving them places of honour within its ranks, putting them where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 153 where is strong THE PARTIES where is p align="justify" petitioner unpopular, this may cost at least £5,000. Finally, there is what is use of motor-cars on election day which does not appear in what is return of expenses. Here what is numbers available to what is Tory candidate often exceed those available to Labour by about twenty-five to one. They have a psychological effect which no advertising expert would underestimate. They are apt to be taken off what is road just when what is working man goes to vote after what is day's labour is done. Their greatest importance is in rural areas where what is polling booth is sometimes far from what is voter's home, and where what is voter is less willing to prevaricate as to what is direction in which his vote will be given. what is Bill of 1930 offered a remedy of this inequality, but it was rejected by what is House of Lords. what is provision for placing cars under what is control of what is Returning Officer contained in that Bill is a desirable reform, as is also what is adoption of what is practice of most continental countries of holding elections on Sundays. We have seen something of what is importance of money and position in what is structure of parties and in what is holding of elections. The theory which we apply to our representative system must take such conditions into account if it is to apply to realities, and not be content with forms. what is genesis of public opinion and of government belongs to this realm that lies behind what is simple names of parry and elections. There are other factors, however, in what is tendencies of development that parties shew which centrally affect what is representative process. A party is a means to an end, but once formed it becomes also an end in itself. It gives positions with status or salaries or both. It canalises what is activity of its most fervid members, giving them places of honour within its ranks, putting them where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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