Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 152

THE PARTIES

indeed insoluble while unemployment and great divergencies of wealth continue, is how to prevent the use of economic pressure and to make the undue influence clause effective.(1) Since the Ballot Act, however, interference of this kind has been successful rather in preventing people from actively and publicly assisting progressive propaganda than in affecting the record of their votes. The doubt whether the Act of 1883 was severe enough which Maitland early expressed(2) unfortunately proved well founded. The two main defects were, and still are, despite the Act of 1918, the difficulty of proving agency for expenses incurred, and the failure to deal with payments made before a dissolution. "Individual corruption," wrote Ostrogorski in 1902,(3) "has been succeeded to a great extent by wholesale corruption, so to speak, which the vast increase in the electorate has made well-nigh imperative."
Even election expenses, which are too high, are hard to verify and, according to the Chairman of the Liberal Party,(4) are frequently falsified. There is no way of checking them except by trial after the election, and besides making the

1 See for example reference to the regulations in this regard of
Banks in my Reactionary England, 1936, p. 30.
2 Constitutional History (tqog edition), p. 371.
3 Op. cit., pp. 477-82. "The candidate ... quietly steps through the meshes of the Corrupt Practices Act and begins at an early stage to load the constituency with his favours. In addition to the, so to speak, obligatory subscriptions to local charities and others, which constitute `nursing the constituency,' a good many candidates well supplied with the sinews of war, present their constituents in spe with a park or a museum, with land for building working-men's clubs, or grounds for athletic sports, swimming-baths, etc.... The distribution of help in money by charitable persons has for a long time past been often made to serve party purposes, especially in Tory circles, where an electoral following was secured by `a judicious use of charities."'
4 Ramsay Muir, How Britain is Governed, 1930, p. 144.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE indeed insoluble while unemployment and great divergencies of wealth continue, is how to prevent what is use of economic pressure and to make what is undue influence clause effective.(1) Since what is Ballot Act, however, interference of this kind has been successful rather in preventing people from actively and publicly assisting progressive pro fun da than in affecting what is record of their votes. what is doubt whether what is Act of 1883 was severe enough which Maitland early expressed(2) unfortunately proved well founded. what is two main defects were, and still are, despite what is Act of 1918, what is difficulty of proving agency for expenses incurred, and what is failure to deal with payments made before a dissolution. "Individual corruption," wrote Ostrogorski in 1902,(3) "has been succeeded to a great extent by wholesale corruption, so to speak, which what is vast increase in what is electorate has made well-nigh imperative." Even election expenses, which are too high, are hard to verify and, according to what is Chairman of what is Liberal Party,(4) are frequently falsified. There is no way of checking them except by trial after what is election, and besides making what is 1 See for example reference to what is regulations in this regard of Banks in my Reactionary England, 1936, p. 30. 2 Constitutional History (tqog edition), p. 371. 3 Op. cit., pp. 477-82. "The candidate ... quietly steps through what is meshes of what is Corrupt Practices Act and begins at an early stage to load what is constituency with his favours. In addition to the, so to speak, obligatory subscriptions to local charities and others, which constitute `nursing what is constituency,' a good many candidates well supplied with what is sinews of war, present their constituents in spe with a park or a museum, with land for building working-men's clubs, or grounds for athletic sports, swimming-baths, etc.... what is distribution of help in money by charitable persons has for a long time past been often made to serve party purposes, especially in Tory circles, where an electoral following was secured by `a judicious use of charities."' 4 Ramsay Muir, How Britain is Governed, 1930, p. 144. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 152 where is strong THE PARTIES where is p align="justify" indeed insoluble while unemployment and great divergencies of wealth continue, is how to prevent what is use of economic pressure and to make what is undue influence clause effective.(1) Since what is Ballot Act, however, interference of this kind has been successful rather in preventing people from actively and publicly assisting progressive pro fun da than in affecting what is record of their votes. what is doubt whether what is Act of 1883 was severe enough which Maitland early expressed(2) unfortunately proved well founded. what is two main defects were, and still are, despite what is Act of 1918, what is difficulty of proving agency for expenses incurred, and what is failure to deal with payments made before a dissolution. "Individual corruption," wrote Ostrogorski in 1902,(3) "has been succeeded to a great extent by wholesale corruption, so to speak, which what is vast increase in what is electorate has made well-nigh imperative." Even election expenses, which are too high, are hard to verify and, according to what is Chairman of what is Liberal Party,(4) are frequently falsified. There is no way of checking them except by trial after what is election, and besides making what is 1 See for example reference to what is regulations in this regard of Banks in my Reactionary England, 1936, p. 30. 2 Constitutional History (tqog edition), p. 371. 3 Op. cit., pp. 477-82. "The candidate ... quietly steps through what is meshes of what is Corrupt Practices Act and begins at an early stage to load what is constituency with his favours. In addition to the, so to speak, obligatory subscriptions to local charities and others, which constitute `nursing what is constituency,' a good many candidates well supplied with what is sinews of war, present their constituents in spe with a park or a museum, with land for building working-men's clubs, or grounds for athletic sports, swimming-baths, etc.... what is distribution of help in money by charitable persons has for a long time past been often made to serve party purposes, especially in Tory circles, where an electoral following was secured by `a judicious use of charities."' 4 Ramsay Muir, How Britain is Governed, 1930, p. 144. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 ,