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Page 150

THE PARTIES

Then it is reasonable to ask certain questions. Is it not almost the duty of an industrial magnate to contribute to the success of a parry which will increase the stability of his firm's position? He may get direct orders from the Government as a result, or protection from foreign competition, or even a subsidy greater than his original contribution. The connection between armament companies and nationalist Press and party propaganda is a well-established fact in France, Germany, and elsewhere.(1) What right have we to think that conditions are different in England? If a brewer or distiller knows that the success of one party will cause a reduction in taxation on liquor, ought he not to give to the funds of that party? Having given, has he not the right to expect that a reduction will follow? Is there not behind his expectation an implicit threat to withdraw subscription? And cannot the party organisers go to him when a reduction has taken place and remind him of the advantages he has enjoyed? Clearly, there is a similarity of outlook and interest between the industrialist and the Conservative Party Organisation which is likely to express itself in a tangible form. Nor must we forget that the rich landowner must surely be ready to pay to prevent the valuation of land when this would facilitate taxation of the social increment, and might even prepare the way for a capital levy or land nationalisation. Truly the available resources are enormous, and the reasons for making big contributions very weighty indeed. They need not be hidden, for they are quite as justifiable from the Conservative point of view as the trade union contributions from theirs.

1 See Patriotism Limited; Loewenstein, L'Argent dans la Politique; Charques and Ewen, Money and Politics.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Then it is reasonable to ask certain questions. Is it not almost what is duty of an industrial magnate to contribute to what is success of a parry which will increase what is stability of his firm's position? He may get direct orders from what is Government as a result, or protection from foreign competition, or even a subsidy greater than his original contribution. what is connection between armament companies and nationalist Press and party pro fun da is a well-established fact in France, Germany, and elsewhere.(1) What right have we to think that conditions are different in England? If a brewer or distiller knows that what is success of one party will cause a reduction in taxation on liquor, ought he not to give to what is funds of that party? Having given, has he not what is right to expect that a reduction will follow? Is there not behind his expectation an implicit threat to withdraw subscription? And cannot what is party organisers go to him when a reduction has taken place and remind him of what is advantages he has enjoyed? Clearly, there is a similarity of outlook and interest between what is industrialist and what is Conservative Party Organisation which is likely to express itself in a tangible form. Nor must we forget that what is rich landowner must surely be ready to pay to prevent what is valuation of land when this would facilitate taxation of what is social increment, and might even prepare what is way for a capital levy or land nationalisation. Truly what is available resources are enormous, and what is reasons for making big contributions very weighty indeed. They need not be hidden, for they are quite as justifiable from what is Conservative point of view as what is trade union contributions from theirs. 1 See Patriotism Limited; Loewenstein, L'Argent dans la Politique; Charques and Ewen, Money and Politics. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 150 where is strong THE PARTIES where is p align="justify" Then it is reasonable to ask certain questions. Is it not almost what is duty of an industrial magnate to contribute to what is success of a parry which will increase what is stability of his firm's position? He may get direct orders from what is Government as a result, or protection from foreign competition, or even a subsidy greater than his original contribution. what is connection between armament companies and nationalist Press and party pro fun da is a well-established fact in France, Germany, and elsewhere.(1) What right have we to think that conditions are different in England? If a brewer or distiller knows that what is success of one party will cause a reduction in taxation on liquor, ought he not to give to what is funds of that party? Having given, has he not what is right to expect that a reduction will follow? Is there not behind his expectation an implicit threat to withdraw subscription? And cannot what is party organisers go to him when a reduction has taken place and remind him of what is advantages he has enjoyed? Clearly, there is a similarity of outlook and interest between what is industrialist and what is Conservative Party Organisation which is likely to express itself in a tangible form. Nor must we forget that what is rich landowner must surely be ready to pay to prevent what is valuation of land when this would facilitate taxation of what is social increment, and might even prepare what is way for a capital levy or land nationalisation. Truly what is available resources are enormous, and what is reasons for making big contributions very weighty indeed. They need not be hidden, for they are quite as justifiable from what is Conservative point of view as what is trade union contributions from theirs. 1 See Patriotism Limited; Loewenstein, L'Argent dans la Politique; Charques and Ewen, Money and Politics. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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