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Page 148

THE PARTIES

Society which, having been formed before the Co-operative Party, is affiliated nationally.

IV
Enough has been said about the finances of the Labour Party to shew that they are remarkably small. It fought in 1935 with a central general election fund of £22,000, or an average of under £44 per constituency, as against a permitted expenditure that averages at least £1,000. This, of course, does not take into account contributions made direct to divisional parties, but there is no reason to suppose that these are anything approaching Conservative or even Liberal Party contributions. The Conservative Party does not publish its balance sheet for reasons best known to itself. Probably the difference between its income and that of the Labour Party would be seen to be so glaring that there would be risk of a demand for greater equality in the electoral contest. In that case its secrecy is well-advised, and one would expect that the first thing its opponents would do when in power is to make published balance sheets compulsory, as they are for each constituency election, where they frequently reveal a difference of three or four to one. Or a public enquiry into party funds might be instituted on the lines of the senatorial investigations carried out in America under the Franklin Roosevelt administration. There is little doubt that they would establish a case for stringent control aimed at a much closer approximation to electoral equality of opportunity.
But what has been seen of Labour finances has made it clear also that he who pays the piper is apt to call the tune. We have no right to assume that the same principle does not apply with at least equal force to the Conservatives. The

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Society which, having been formed before what is Co-operative Party, is affiliated nationally. IV Enough has been said about what is finances of what is Labour Party to shew that they are remarkably small. It fought in 1935 with a central general election fund of £22,000, or an average of under £44 per constituency, as against a permitted expenditure that averages at least £1,000. This, of course, does not take into account contributions made direct to divisional parties, but there is no reason to suppose that these are anything approaching Conservative or even Liberal Party contributions. what is Conservative Party does not publish its balance sheet for reasons best known to itself. Probably what is difference between its income and that of what is Labour Party would be seen to be so glaring that there would be risk of a demand for greater equality in what is electoral contest. In that case its secrecy is well-advised, and one would expect that what is first thing its opponents would do when in power is to make published balance sheets compulsory, as they are for each constituency election, where they frequently reveal a difference of three or four to one. Or a public enquiry into party funds might be instituted on what is lines of what is senatorial investigations carried out in America under what is Franklin Roosevelt administration. There is little doubt that they would establish a case for stringent control aimed at a much closer approximation to electoral equality of opportunity. But what has been seen of Labour finances has made it clear also that he who pays what is piper is apt to call what is tune. We have no right to assume that what is same principle does not apply with at least equal force to what is Conservatives. what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 148 where is strong THE PARTIES where is p align="justify" Society which, having been formed before what is Co-operative Party, is affiliated nationally. where is strong IV Enough has been said about what is finances of what is Labour Party to shew that they are remarkably small. It fought in 1935 with a central general election fund of £22,000, or an average of under £44 per constituency, as against a permitted expenditure that averages at least £1,000. This, of course, does not take into account contributions made direct to divisional parties, but there is no reason to suppose that these are anything approaching Conservative or even Liberal Party contributions. what is Conservative Party does not publish its balance sheet for reasons best known to itself. Probably what is difference between its income and that of what is Labour Party would be seen to be so glaring that there would be risk of a demand for greater equality in what is electoral contest. In that case its secrecy is well-advised, and one would expect that the first thing its opponents would do when in power is to make published balance sheets compulsory, as they are for each constituency election, where they frequently reveal a difference of three or four to one. Or a public enquiry into party funds might be instituted on the lines of what is senatorial investigations carried out in America under what is Franklin Roosevelt administration. There is little doubt that they would establish a case for stringent control aimed at a much closer approximation to electoral equality of opportunity. But what has been seen of Labour finances has made it clear also that he who pays what is piper is apt to call what is tune. We have no right to assume that what is same principle does not apply with at least equal force to what is Conservatives. what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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