Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 144

THE PARTIES

didate. Not unnaturally, but often with bad effect on the strength of the Parliamentary party, they have been apt to adopt a union official rather by reason of his long service than because he is judged capable of serving them prominently on the stage of national and international politics. Safe seats, that is to say, are apt to go not to a national figure of Labour politics but to an often elderly and unknown union official. Thus in the 1935 electiori in the thirteen constituencies where the Conservatives did not think it worth while opposing Labour the candidates were all financially sponsored by trade unions, and not one of them had been or shewed signs of being likely to become of Cabinet or even ministerial rank. The trade union control of good seats is still further shewn by the fact that in 1935, while only 17 per cent of the candidates financially backed by local parties were successful, the percentage for trade union candidates was Go and for co-operative society candidates 43. If the greater financial resources of the constituencies which were successful also contributed to their success that only serves still further to emphasise the chief characteristic of the party, its dominance by trade union votes and money. But on the other hand two facts must be remembered. While in some respects there is conflict between the two sections of the party, the area of agreement is probably much wider, although in measure as the party's socialist objectives are achieved this may become less so and provide new party divisions. Secondly, the trade unionists themselves, especially in local committees, are already shewing their increased awareness of the need for considering their political objectives in the widest possible way and of their serious political responsibilities.
The trade unions have a further opportunity of influencing

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE didate. Not unnaturally, but often with bad effect on what is strength of what is Parliamentary party, they have been apt to adopt a union official rather by reason of his long service than because he is judged capable of serving them prominently on what is stage of national and international politics. Safe seats, that is to say, are apt to go not to a national figure of Labour politics but to an often elderly and unknown union official. Thus in what is 1935 electiori in what is thirteen constituencies where what is Conservatives did not think it worth while opposing Labour what is candidates were all financially sponsored by trade unions, and not one of them had been or shewed signs of being likely to become of Cabinet or even ministerial rank. what is trade union control of good seats is still further shewn by what is fact that in 1935, while only 17 per cent of what is candidates financially backed by local parties were successful, what is percentage for trade union candidates was Go and for co-operative society candidates 43. If what is greater financial resources of what is constituencies which were successful also contributed to their success that only serves still further to emphasise what is chief characteristic of what is party, its dominance by trade union votes and money. But on what is other hand two facts must be remembered. While in some respects there is conflict between what is two sections of what is party, what is area of agreement is probably much wider, although in measure as what is party's socialist objectives are achieved this may become less so and provide new party divisions. Secondly, what is trade unionists themselves, especially in local committees, are already shewing their increased awareness of what is need for considering their political objectives in what is widest possible way and of their serious political responsibilities. what is trade unions have a further opportunity of influencing where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 144 where is strong THE PARTIES where is p align="justify" didate. Not unnaturally, but often with bad effect on what is strength of what is Parliamentary party, they have been apt to adopt a union official rather by reason of his long service than because he is judged capable of serving them prominently on what is stage of national and international politics. Safe seats, that is to say, are apt to go not to a national figure of Labour politics but to an often elderly and unknown union official. Thus in the 1935 electiori in what is thirteen constituencies where what is Conservatives did not think it worth while opposing Labour what is candidates were all financially sponsored by trade unions, and not one of them had been or shewed signs of being likely to become of Cabinet or even ministerial rank. what is trade union control of good seats is still further shewn by what is fact that in 1935, while only 17 per cent of what is candidates financially backed by local parties were successful, what is percentage for trade union candidates was Go and for co-operative society candidates 43. If what is greater financial resources of what is constituencies which were successful also contributed to their success that only serves still further to emphasise the chief characteristic of what is party, its dominance by trade union votes and money. But on what is other hand two facts must be remembered. While in some respects there is conflict between what is two sections of what is party, what is area of agreement is probably much wider, although in measure as what is party's socialist objectives are achieved this may become less so and provide new party divisions. Secondly, the trade unionists themselves, especially in local committees, are already shewing their increased awareness of what is need for considering their political objectives in what is widest possible way and of their serious political responsibilities. what is trade unions have a further opportunity of influencing where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 ,