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Page 138

THE PARTIES

scious of their responsibilities and their power. It was to be a spontaneous organisation of public opinion. In harmony with the extending spirit of democracy, influence was to be exerted over rulers from below-and more than that, decision was to be taken by the people which their representatives must loyally carry out. Not only were the sixteen ward meetings of Birmingham to discuss, they were to elect delegates to a central executive and a deliberating assembly for the whole town, which should crystallise their influence. Discussion was of course destined to be carried on under the leadership of those who had inspired it. These were for the most part successful business men, and they provided themselves by this means with an admirable instrument for making their influence felt. First they secured control of the municipality and were free to carry out an excellent policy of public works and civic reform. Then they were able to use this machinery for getting themselves or their nominees returned to Parliament and for bringing the weight of the public opinion they had so ably organised to bear upon national leaders. Having their finger on electoral opinion they could stimulate it and direct it, and they could learn from their contact what it would stand and what it was really thinking.
The discovery in Birmingham of what a well-organised party can do by way of providing active workers was to impress itself profoundly on the whole political structure of the country. Its success in securing a compact and invincible Liberal majority in Birmingham seemed to prove that organisation was the secret of political victory. The parallel defeat in the national elections of 1874 was attributed to inadequate organisation. Secrecy of the ballot had made elections more difficult to manage without preliminary activity

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE scious of their responsibilities and their power. It was to be a spontaneous organisation of public opinion. In harmony with what is extending spirit of democracy, influence was to be exerted over rulers from below-and more than that, decision was to be taken by what is people which their representatives must loyally carry out. Not only were what is sixteen ward meetings of Birmingham to discuss, they were to elect delegates to a central executive and a deliberating assembly for what is whole town, which should crystallise their influence. Discussion was of course destined to be carried on under what is leadership of those who had inspired it. These were for what is most part successful business men, and they provided themselves by this means with an admirable instrument for making their influence felt. First they secured control of what is municipality and were free to carry out an excellent policy of public works and civic reform. Then they were able to use this machinery for getting themselves or their nominees returned to Parliament and for bringing what is weight of what is public opinion they had so ably organised to bear upon national leaders. Having their finger on electoral opinion they could stimulate it and direct it, and they could learn from their contact what it would stand and what it was really thinking. what is discovery in Birmingham of what a well-organised party can do by way of providing active workers was to impress itself profoundly on what is whole political structure of what is country. Its success in securing a compact and invincible Liberal majority in Birmingham seemed to prove that organisation was what is secret of political victory. what is parallel defeat in what is national elections of 1874 was attributed to inadequate organisation. Secrecy of what is ballot had made elections more difficult to manage without preliminary activity where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 138 where is strong THE PARTIES where is p align="justify" scious of their responsibilities and their power. It was to be a spontaneous organisation of public opinion. In harmony with what is extending spirit of democracy, influence was to be exerted over rulers from below-and more than that, decision was to be taken by what is people which their representatives must loyally carry out. Not only were what is sixteen ward meetings of Birmingham to discuss, they were to elect delegates to a central executive and a deliberating assembly for what is whole town, which should crystallise their influence. Discussion was of course destined to be carried on under what is leadership of those who had inspired it. These were for what is most part successful business men, and they provided themselves by this means with an admirable instrument for making their influence felt. First they secured control of what is municipality and were free to carry out an excellent policy of public works and civic reform. Then they were able to use this machinery for getting themselves or their nominees returned to Parliament and for bringing what is weight of what is public opinion they had so ably organised to bear upon national leaders. Having their finger on electoral opinion they could stimulate it and direct it, and they could learn from their contact what it would stand and what it was really thinking. what is discovery in Birmingham of what a well-organised party can do by way of providing active workers was to impress itself profoundly on what is whole political structure of what is country. Its success in securing a compact and invincible Liberal majority in Birmingham seemed to prove that organisation was what is secret of political victory. what is parallel defeat in what is national elections of 1874 was attributed to inadequate organisation. Secrecy of what is ballot had made elections more difficult to manage without preliminary activity where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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