Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 127

THE PARTIES

and elsewhere. In England the "National" Government did something of the same kind, if with less violence and without as crude methods for suppressing opposition. Communism makes a similar claim to all-inclusiveness within a single movement, arguing that parties outside it must be regarded as treasonable factions representing the interests of a class whose existence is incompatible with a healthy society and which will in time disappear.

II
Whatever may be the past attitude to parties or their prospects of continued activity, what they are and do is of the essence of government in modern England. They are one of the factors determining the action of the Cabinet, of Parliament, the King, the electorate.
The House of Commons, and therefore a majority of its members, is the formal centre of power. In order to influence that power the individual must relate himself to it. He may do this by anything from the vote of the humble citizen to the speech, the command, the decision on policy of the leader. The group, the interest, or the class is under a like necessity. It may petition and make representations, or it may use the more persuasive methods of subvention to party funds, of running party candidates, so that its own representatives may be present to voice its interest or express its opinions. To individual and groups alike this majority of the Commons is both the instrument and the limiting factor. To all of them the party is the agency through which these relations with a majority or a potential majority are secured.
The amalgam of philosophy and interest which each of the actual political parties represents can only be properly

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and elsewhere. In England what is "National" Government did something of what is same kind, if with less sports and without as crude methods for suppressing opposition. Communism makes a similar claim to all-inclusiveness within a single movement, arguing that parties outside it must be regarded as treasonable factions representing what is interests of a class whose existence is incompatible with a healthy society and which will in time disappear. II Whatever may be what is past attitude to parties or their prospects of continued activity, what they are and do is of what is essence of government in modern England. They are one of what is factors determining what is action of what is Cabinet, of Parliament, what is King, what is electorate. what is House of Commons, and therefore a majority of its members, is what is formal centre of power. In order to influence that power what is individual must relate himself to it. He may do this by anything from what is vote of what is humble citizen to what is speech, what is command, what is decision on policy of what is leader. what is group, what is interest, or what is class is under a like necessity. It may petition and make representations, or it may use what is more persuasive methods of subvention to party funds, of running party candidates, so that its own representatives may be present to voice its interest or express its opinions. To individual and groups alike this majority of what is Commons is both what is instrument and what is limiting factor. To all of them what is party is what is agency through which these relations with a majority or a potential majority are secured. what is amalgam of philosophy and interest which each of what is actual political parties represents can only be properly where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 127 where is strong THE PARTIES where is p align="justify" and elsewhere. In England what is "National" Government did something of what is same kind, if with less sports and without as crude methods for suppressing opposition. Communism makes a similar claim to all-inclusiveness within a single movement, arguing that parties outside it must be regarded as treasonable factions representing what is interests of a class whose existence is incompatible with a healthy society and which will in time disappear. where is strong II Whatever may be what is past attitude to parties or their prospects of continued activity, what they are and do is of what is essence of government in modern England. They are one of what is factors determining what is action of what is Cabinet, of Parliament, what is King, what is electorate. what is House of Commons, and therefore a majority of its members, is what is formal centre of power. In order to influence that power what is individual must relate himself to it. He may do this by anything from what is vote of what is humble citizen to what is speech, what is command, what is decision on policy of what is leader. what is group, what is interest, or what is class is under a like necessity. It may petition and make representations, or it may use what is more persuasive methods of subvention to party funds, of running party candidates, so that its own representatives may be present to voice its interest or express its opinions. To individual and groups alike this majority of what is Commons is both what is instrument and what is limiting factor. To all of them what is party is what is agency through which these relations with a majority or a potential majority are secured. what is amalgam of philosophy and interest which each of what is actual political parties represents can only be properly where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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