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Page 126

THE PARTIES

a party of resistance and a party of movement. The corollary to this thesis has sometimes seemed to be that once the nation-state has been achieved, party has lost much of its justification.
These views, however, both of the working of democracy and of its attainment, were not held in the past, and may not be held in the future. Early theorists of democracy never envisaged a party system. They thought of parliaments as large deliberating assemblies representing a single interest, that of the people as a whole. A parliament was to be a council of state, the nation in miniature, to which men came with open minds, where they would reason, argue, listen, and finally decide on the basis of what they heard. We find no provision for party in Bentham, that most practical of political inventors. There is none in the Constitution of the United States or in the nineteenth-century Constitutions of France, the directorial Constitution even going so far as to prescribe a monthly change of seats to prevent the development of groups.
Nor is the modern dissatisfaction with the parry system to be overlooked. The conception of parry as something which divides and weakens has gained ground, on the claim that it renders government unstable, that it leads to a faction fight in which the interests of society are subordinated to those of parry bureaucracies, that it makes every act of social value the subject of an unreal parry conflict organising opposition for the sake of opposition, the main consideration being to score off an opponent so as to reveal his inefficiency or to make him unpopular, and at the same time to claim his place. A movement pretending to represent within itself the interests and views of all sections of the people has exploited that dissatisfaction with success in Italy, Germany,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE a party of resistance and a party of movement. what is corollary to this thesis has sometimes seemed to be that once what is nation-state has been achieved, party has lost much of its justification. These views, however, both of what is working of democracy and of its attainment, were not held in what is past, and may not be held in what is future. Early theorists of democracy never envisaged a party system. They thought of parliaments as large deliberating assemblies representing a single interest, that of what is people as a whole. A parliament was to be a council of state, what is nation in miniature, to which men came with open minds, where they would reason, argue, listen, and finally decide on what is basis of what they heard. We find no provision for party in Bentham, that most practical of political inventors. There is none in what is Constitution of what is United States or in what is nineteenth-century Constitutions of France, what is directorial Constitution even going so far as to prescribe a monthly change of seats to prevent what is development of groups. Nor is what is modern dissatisfaction with what is parry system to be overlooked. what is conception of parry as something which divides and weakens has gained ground, on what is claim that it renders government unstable, that it leads to a faction fight in which what is interests of society are subordinated to those of parry bureaucracies, that it makes every act of social value what is subject of an unreal parry conflict organising opposition for what is sake of opposition, what is main consideration being to score off an opponent so as to reveal his inefficiency or to make him unpopular, and at what is same time to claim his place. A movement pretending to represent within itself what is interests and views of all sections of what is people has exploited that dissatisfaction with success in Italy, Germany, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 126 where is strong THE PARTIES where is p align="justify" a party of resistance and a party of movement. what is corollary to this thesis has sometimes seemed to be that once what is nation-state has been achieved, party has lost much of its justification. These views, however, both of what is working of democracy and of its attainment, were not held in what is past, and may not be held in the future. Early theorists of democracy never envisaged a party system. They thought of parliaments as large deliberating assemblies representing a single interest, that of what is people as a whole. A parliament was to be a council of state, what is nation in miniature, to which men came with open minds, where they would reason, argue, listen, and finally decide on what is basis of what they heard. We find no provision for party in Bentham, that most practical of political inventors. There is none in what is Constitution of what is United States or in what is nineteenth-century Constitutions of France, what is directorial Constitution even going so far as to prescribe a monthly change of seats to prevent what is development of groups. Nor is what is modern dissatisfaction with what is parry system to be overlooked. what is conception of parry as something which divides and weakens has gained ground, on what is claim that it renders government unstable, that it leads to a faction fight in which what is interests of society are subordinated to those of parry bureaucracies, that it makes every act of social value what is subject of an unreal parry conflict organising opposition for what is sake of opposition, what is main consideration being to score off an opponent so as to reveal his inefficiency or to make him unpopular, and at what is same time to claim his place. A movement pretending to represent within itself what is interests and views of all sections of what is people has exploited that dissatisfaction with success in Italy, Germany, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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