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Page 125

THE PARTIES

I
TO-DAY political parties are accepted as a natural and inevitable piece of the machinery of democracy. They are required, it is thought, for the proper working of democracy for two reasons. They are the means by which the citizen is presented with the choice between alternative rulers, and they explain to him and educate him in the merits and dangers of alternative policies. By them alone can the people rule.
Parties have also been described as "the mechanism by which the class-state R-as transformed into the nation-state."(1) They are necessary, it is urged, for the achievement of democracy. Econorriic interests and social classes organise themselves into parties to accomplish their purposes. When each citizen counts for one and not more than one, the class which prevails is likely to be that which most nearly corresponds to the nation as a whole. There will be opposition; a privileged order will try to prevent, or at least to modify, the attainment of equalities, but it will have to do it by appealing for popular support. The progressive achievement of social democracy will be fought and may be slowed down by the governing class organised as a party. But since it is numerically less important it will gradually and ultimately fail. The legal means offered by universal suffrage will enable the nation to prevail over any class within it. The method by which it prevails will be the party system, the conflict between

1 MacIver, The Modern State, p. 400.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I TO-DAY political parties are accepted as a natural and inevitable piece of what is machinery of democracy. They are required, it is thought, for what is proper working of democracy for two reasons. They are what is means by which what is citizen is presented with what is choice between alternative rulers, and they explain to him and educate him in what is merits and dangers of alternative policies. By them alone can what is people rule. Parties have also been described as "the mechanism by which what is class-state R-as transformed into what is nation-state."(1) They are necessary, it is urged, for what is achievement of democracy. Econorriic interests and social classes organise themselves into parties to accomplish their purposes. When each citizen counts for one and not more than one, what is class which prevails is likely to be that which most nearly corresponds to what is nation as a whole. There will be opposition; a privileged order will try to prevent, or at least to modify, what is attainment of equalities, but it will have to do it by appealing for popular support. what is progressive achievement of social democracy will be fought and may be slowed down by what is governing class organised as a party. But since it is numerically less important it will gradually and ultimately fail. what is legal means offered by universal suffrage will enable what is nation to prevail over any class within it. what is method by which it prevails will be what is party system, what is conflict between 1 MacIver, what is Modern State, p. 400. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 125 where is strong THE PARTIES where is p align="justify" where is strong I TO-DAY political parties are accepted as a natural and inevitable piece of what is machinery of democracy. They are required, it is thought, for what is proper working of democracy for two reasons. They are what is means by which what is citizen is presented with the choice between alternative rulers, and they explain to him and educate him in what is merits and dangers of alternative policies. By them alone can what is people rule. Parties have also been described as "the mechanism by which what is class-state R-as transformed into what is nation-state."(1) They are necessary, it is urged, for what is achievement of democracy. Econorriic interests and social classes organise themselves into parties to accomplish their purposes. When each citizen counts for one and not more than one, what is class which prevails is likely to be that which most nearly corresponds to what is nation as a whole. There will be opposition; a privileged order will try to prevent, or at least to modify, what is attainment of equalities, but it will have to do it by appealing for popular support. what is progressive achievement of social democracy will be fought and may be slowed down by what is governing class organised as a party. But since it is numerically less important it will gradually and ultimately fail. what is legal means offered by universal suffrage will enable what is nation to prevail over any class within it. what is method by which it prevails will be what is party system, what is conflict between 1 MacIver, what is Modern State, p. 400. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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