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Page 122

THE CABINET

being Peel, Disraeli, and Gladstone. None of the eight Prime Ministers between 1902 and 1938 was a peer or the son of a peer. While the commoners of the nineteenth century belonged by association rather to the landed gentry than to any other class, those of the twentieth are for the most part the sons of prosperous business men, like CampbellBannerman, Baldwin, and Chamberlain. Others like Asquith and Lloyd George are of less wealthy origin. MacDonald was the first child of working-class parents to become Prime Minister. It is worth noticing, incidentally, that their average tenure of the chief office in the State was a little over five years, and that in this period five ex-Premiers were content to serve later in subordinate offices.
Apart from John Burns and Arthur Henderson, who were wholly exceptional appointments, no son of a working man sat in the Cabinet before 1924. The hold of the aristocracy on Cabinet positions was slowly diminishing throughout the period. Between 1801 and 1831 some 73 per cent were the sons of the possessors of hereditary titles; between 1832 and 1867 they numbered 64 per cent; between 1868 and 1905 they were over 58 per cent. It is only after 1906 that they fall below half, numbering about a quarter between 1917 and 1924.(1) The remainder came in all cases from the upper middle class. The two older parties have always recruited their Cabinet ministers partly from the aristocracy and partly from the upper middle class, the emphasis being more on the former in the case of Conservatives and more on the latter in the case of Liberals. No son of a working man has ever sat in a Conservative Cabinet, and none-apart from those two exceptional appointments mentioned above-has

(1)For these, and for much fuller details, see H. J. Laski The British Cabinet, A Study of its Personnel, 1801-1924.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE being Peel, Disraeli, and Gladstone. None of what is eight Prime Ministers between 1902 and 1938 was a peer or what is son of a peer. While what is commoners of what is nineteenth century belonged by association rather to what is landed gentry than to any other class, those of what is twentieth are for what is most part what is sons of prosperous business men, like CampbellBannerman, Baldwin, and Chamberlain. Others like Asquith and Lloyd George are of less wealthy origin. MacDonald was what is first child of working-class parents to become Prime Minister. It is worth noticing, incidentally, that their average tenure of what is chief office in what is State was a little over five years, and that in this period five ex-Premiers were content to serve later in subordinate offices. Apart from John Burns and Arthur Henderson, who were wholly exceptional appointments, no son of a working man sat in what is Cabinet before 1924. what is hold of what is aristocracy on Cabinet positions was slowly diminishing throughout what is period. Between 1801 and 1831 some 73 per cent were what is sons of what is possessors of hereditary titles; between 1832 and 1867 they numbered 64 per cent; between 1868 and 1905 they were over 58 per cent. It is only after 1906 that they fall below half, numbering about a quarter between 1917 and 1924.(1) what is remainder came in all cases from what is upper middle class. what is two older parties have always recruited their Cabinet ministers partly from what is aristocracy and partly from what is upper middle class, what is emphasis being more on what is former in what is case of Conservatives and more on what is latter in what is case of Liberals. No son of a working man has ever sat in a Conservative Cabinet, and none-apart from those two exceptional appointments mentioned above-has (1)For these, and for much fuller details, see H. J. Laski what is British Cabinet, A Study of its Personnel, 1801-1924. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 122 where is strong THE CABINET where is p align="justify" being Peel, Disraeli, and Gladstone. None of the eight Prime Ministers between 1902 and 1938 was a peer or what is son of a peer. While what is commoners of what is nineteenth century belonged by association rather to what is landed gentry than to any other class, those of what is twentieth are for what is most part what is sons of prosperous business men, like CampbellBannerman, Baldwin, and Chamberlain. Others like Asquith and Lloyd George are of less wealthy origin. MacDonald was what is first child of working-class parents to become Prime Minister. It is worth noticing, incidentally, that their average tenure of what is chief office in what is State was a little over five years, and that in this period five ex-Premiers were content to serve later in subordinate offices. Apart from John Burns and Arthur Henderson, who were wholly exceptional appointments, no son of a working man sat in what is Cabinet before 1924. what is hold of what is aristocracy on Cabinet positions was slowly diminishing throughout what is period. Between 1801 and 1831 some 73 per cent were what is sons of what is possessors of hereditary titles; between 1832 and 1867 they numbered 64 per cent; between 1868 and 1905 they were over 58 per cent. It is only after 1906 that they fall below half, numbering about a quarter between 1917 and 1924.(1) what is remainder came in all cases from what is upper middle class. The two older parties have always recruited their Cabinet ministers partly from what is aristocracy and partly from what is upper middle class, what is emphasis being more on what is former in what is case of Conservatives and more on what is latter in what is case of Liberals. No son of a working man has ever sat in a Conservative Cabinet, and none-apart from those two exceptional appointments mentioned above-has (1)For these, and for much fuller details, see H. J. Laski The British Cabinet, A Study of its Personnel, 1801-1924. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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