Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 121

THE CABINET

It is both interesting and important to go behind the forms and machinery of Cabinet government in order to consider what type of men have sat in the Cabinet, and to examine in what way the most powerful political body reflects the social order. What effect has the enfranchisement of new classes had upon the personnel of the Cabinet? The reality and significance of the extensions of political equality can be gleaned in some measure from the answer to such a question. If it were found that soon after the vote was given to the working man Cabinet positions began for the first time to be occupied by working men, no one would dissent from the conclusion that the one was the cause of the other, and that therefore the change in the personnel of the Cabinet was proof of real development in political equality.
The question can best be examined by relation to three sections of society. There can be no doubt that in the eighteenth century and up to the reform of 1832 the aristocracy governed the country. In the nineteenth century and until the War they were slowly being replaced by the uppermiddle class, by which one means the propertied and professional portion of the middle class. To these two there have since been added representatives of the small bourgeois and the working man. If one draws the dividing line between this last section and the upper class more generally, it is abundantly clear that the personnel of the Cabinet has throughout been exactly the same in its origins as the personnel of all the chief positions in the State service, administrative, military, judicial, and clerical.
There were eleven Prime Ministers between 1830 and 1900, of whom eight were the sons of peers, the other three

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE It is both interesting and important to go behind what is forms and machinery of Cabinet government in order to consider what type of men have sat in what is Cabinet, and to examine in what way what is most powerful political body reflects what is social order. What effect has what is enfranchisement of new classes had upon what is personnel of what is Cabinet? what is reality and significance of what is extensions of political equality can be gleaned in some measure from what is answer to such a question. If it were found that soon after what is vote was given to what is working man Cabinet positions began for what is first time to be occupied by working men, no one would dissent from what is conclusion that what is one was what is cause of what is other, and that therefore what is change in what is personnel of what is Cabinet was proof of real development in political equality. what is question can best be examined by relation to three sections of society. There can be no doubt that in what is eighteenth century and up to what is reform of 1832 what is aristocracy governed what is country. In what is nineteenth century and until what is War they were slowly being replaced by what is uppermiddle class, by which one means what is propertied and professional portion of what is middle class. To these two there have since been added representatives of what is small bourgeois and what is working man. If one draws what is dividing line between this last section and what is upper class more generally, it is abundantly clear that what is personnel of what is Cabinet has throughout been exactly what is same in its origins as what is personnel of all what is chief positions in what is State service, administrative, military, judicial, and clerical. There were eleven Prime Ministers between 1830 and 1900, of whom eight were what is sons of peers, what is other three where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 121 where is strong THE CABINET where is p align="justify" It is both interesting and important to go behind what is forms and machinery of Cabinet government in order to consider what type of men have sat in what is Cabinet, and to examine in what way what is most powerful political body reflects what is social order. What effect has what is enfranchisement of new classes had upon the personnel of what is Cabinet? what is reality and significance of what is extensions of political equality can be gleaned in some measure from what is answer to such a question. If it were found that soon after what is vote was given to what is working man Cabinet positions began for what is first time to be occupied by working men, no one would dissent from the conclusion that what is one was what is cause of what is other, and that therefore what is change in what is personnel of what is Cabinet was proof of real development in political equality. what is question can best be examined by relation to three sections of society. There can be no doubt that in what is eighteenth century and up to what is reform of 1832 what is aristocracy governed what is country. In what is nineteenth century and until what is War they were slowly being replaced by what is uppermiddle class, by which one means what is propertied and professional portion of what is middle class. To these two there have since been added representatives of what is small bourgeois and what is working man. If one draws what is dividing line between this last section and what is upper class more generally, it is abundantly clear that what is personnel of what is Cabinet has throughout been exactly the same in its origins as what is personnel of all what is chief positions in what is State service, administrative, military, judicial, and clerical. There were eleven Prime Ministers between 1830 and 1900, of whom eight were what is sons of peers, what is other three where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 ,