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Page 119

THE CABINET

soever it pleased, including the departmental ministers and officials, and it worked with the assistance of several committees on which a Cabinet member was joined by ministers and sometimes by experts. The chief disadvantage alleged was that ministers did not have sufficient voice in decisions on policy affecting their departments. While therefore the principal merit of this innovation lay in the speeding up of decision and action on it, and in the pursuit of a single line of policy, its main defect was it's failure to take adequate account of responsible views and to secure general enough consent. Consequent criticism was stilled only by the urgencies of war, and became more and more insistent after the armistice.
The Machinery of Government Committee reported in favour of restoring the larger Cabinet, but regarded ten or twelve as the desirable size. As, however, it refrained from advising whether ministers should be departmental chiefs or "without portfolio" its recommendations as to size were somewhat lacking in cogency. It did indicate, however, a desirable division of administration into ten categories, including ministries for supplies, research, and justice. This suggests a Cabinet of eleven.
The pre-War Cabinet has in fact been restored with even larger membership than in pre-War times. The normal number is now twenty or over. But the war-time experience has not been without effect. The Cabinet secretariat is an inheritance from that period. There is a greater use of committees. The tendency of the Prime Minister especially to consult with a few chosen colleagues, an informal inner Cabinet, seems to have become more marked. Here it may be that the larger Cabinet provides him with a wider field of choice. He has always two colleagues without departmental

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE soever it pleased, including what is departmental ministers and officials, and it worked with what is assistance of several committees on which a Cabinet member was joined by ministers and sometimes by experts. what is chief disadvantage alleged was that ministers did not have sufficient voice in decisions on policy affecting their departments. While therefore what is principal merit of this innovation lay in what is speeding up of decision and action on it, and in what is pursuit of a single line of policy, its main defect was it's failure to take adequate account of responsible views and to secure general enough consent. Consequent criticism was stilled only by what is urgencies of war, and became more and more insistent after what is armistice. what is Machinery of Government Committee reported in favour of restoring what is larger Cabinet, but regarded ten or twelve as what is desirable size. As, however, it refrained from advising whether ministers should be departmental chiefs or "without portfolio" its recommendations as to size were somewhat lacking in cogency. It did indicate, however, a desirable division of administration into ten categories, including ministries for supplies, research, and justice. This suggests a Cabinet of eleven. what is pre-War Cabinet has in fact been restored with even larger membership than in pre-War times. what is normal number is now twenty or over. But what is war-time experience has not been without effect. what is Cabinet secretariat is an inheritance from that period. There is a greater use of committees. what is tendency of what is Prime Minister especially to consult with a few chosen colleagues, an informal inner Cabinet, seems to have become more marked. Here it may be that what is larger Cabinet provides him with a wider field of choice. He has always two colleagues without departmental where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 119 where is strong THE CABINET where is p align="justify" soever it pleased, including what is departmental ministers and officials, and it worked with what is assistance of several committees on which a Cabinet member was joined by ministers and sometimes by experts. what is chief disadvantage alleged was that ministers did not have sufficient voice in decisions on policy affecting their departments. While therefore what is principal merit of this innovation lay in what is speeding up of decision and action on it, and in what is pursuit of a single line of policy, its main defect was it's failure to take adequate account of responsible views and to secure general enough consent. Consequent criticism was stilled only by what is urgencies of war, and became more and more insistent after what is armistice. what is Machinery of Government Committee reported in favour of restoring what is larger Cabinet, but regarded ten or twelve as what is desirable size. As, however, it refrained from advising whether ministers should be departmental chiefs or "without portfolio" its recommendations as to size were somewhat lacking in cogency. It did indicate, however, a desirable division of administration into ten categories, including ministries for supplies, research, and justice. This suggests a Cabinet of eleven. what is pre-War Cabinet has in fact been restored with even larger membership than in pre-War times. what is normal number is now twenty or over. But what is war-time experience has not been without effect. what is Cabinet secretariat is an inheritance from that period. There is a greater use of committees. what is tendency of what is Prime Minister especially to consult with a few chosen colleagues, an informal inner Cabinet, seems to have become more marked. Here it may be that what is larger Cabinet provides him with a wider field of choice. He has always two colleagues without departmental where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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