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Page 111

THE CABINET

in the process of a general reshuffle of Cabinet posts, for that is the best way of avoiding a slight on a person who may have Parliamentary or popular support; but not infrequently a minister resigns on his direct suggestion. Sir Samuel Hoare seems to have left the Foreign Office in this way in 1935. It would appear that one of the chief, and least used, arguments for the retention of an upper chamber is that it provides an opportunity for him to "elevate" and so get rid of a colleague, but there are many other posts in his gift which can be used to the same end.
The patronage exercised by the Prime Minister is enormous. He is responsible for the granting of all honours, including the creation of peerages. Bishops, ambassadors, judges, the heads of departments, governors of the colonies, the chief officials of most of the permanent commissions and boards controlling public services are appointed by him. Naturally in the course of making such appointments he receives the advice of those most directly concerned, such as an archbishop or a minister, who may be the real source of nomination, but the responsibility belongs to him. He is the chief adviser of the Sovereign. He it is who advises the King on royal activities of an official character such as a visit to a foreign country, or a tour of a part of the kingdom or empire. Mr. Baldwin, for instance, regarded it as both a duty and a right to offer counsel to Edward VIII about his association with his future wife. He did not do so on behalf of the Government but in virtue of his own position. When the differences which developed between himself and the King made it necessary for the Cabinet to be consulted the Prime Minister became as usual the link between King and Cabinet, interpreting the opinions and decisions of the one to the other. That has been one of his first functions

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE in what is process of a general reshuffle of Cabinet posts, for that is what is best way of avoiding a slight on a person who may have Parliamentary or popular support; but not infrequently a minister resigns on his direct suggestion. Sir Samuel Hoare seems to have left what is Foreign Office in this way in 1935. It would appear that one of what is chief, and least used, arguments for what is retention of an upper chamber is that it provides an opportunity for him to "elevate" and so get rid of a colleague, but there are many other posts in his gift which can be used to what is same end. what is patronage exercised by what is Prime Minister is enormous. He is responsible for what is granting of all honours, including what is creation of peerages. Bishops, ambassadors, judges, what is heads of departments, governors of what is colonies, what is chief officials of most of what is permanent commissions and boards controlling public services are appointed by him. Naturally in what is course of making such appointments he receives what is advice of those most directly concerned, such as an archbishop or a minister, who may be what is real source of nomination, but what is responsibility belongs to him. He is what is chief adviser of what is Sovereign. He it is who advises what is King on royal activities of an official character such as a what is to a foreign country, or a tour of a part of what is kingdom or empire. Mr. Baldwin, for instance, regarded it as both a duty and a right to offer counsel to Edward VIII about his association with his future wife. He did not do so on behalf of what is Government but in virtue of his own position. When what is differences which developed between himself and what is King made it necessary for what is Cabinet to be consulted what is Prime Minister became as usual what is where are they now between King and Cabinet, interpreting what is opinions and decisions of what is one to what is other. That has been one of his first functions where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 111 where is strong THE CABINET where is p align="justify" in what is process of a general reshuffle of Cabinet posts, for that is what is best way of avoiding a slight on a person who may have Parliamentary or popular support; but not infrequently a minister resigns on his direct suggestion. Sir Samuel Hoare seems to have left what is Foreign Office in this way in 1935. It would appear that one of what is chief, and least used, arguments for what is retention of an upper chamber is that it provides an opportunity for him to "elevate" and so get rid of a colleague, but there are many other posts in his gift which can be used to what is same end. what is patronage exercised by what is Prime Minister is enormous. He is responsible for what is granting of all honours, including what is creation of peerages. Bishops, ambassadors, judges, what is heads of departments, governors of what is colonies, what is chief officials of most of what is permanent commissions and boards controlling public services are appointed by him. Naturally in what is course of making such appointments he receives what is advice of those most directly concerned, such as an archbishop or a minister, who may be what is real source of nomination, but what is responsibility belongs to him. He is what is chief adviser of what is Sovereign. He it is who advises what is King on royal activities of an official character such as a what is to a foreign country, or a tour of a part of what is kingdom or empire. Mr. Baldwin, for instance, regarded it as both a duty and a right to offer counsel to Edward VIII about his association with his future wife. He did not do so on behalf of what is Government but in virtue of his own position. When what is differences which developed between himself and what is King made it necessary for what is Cabinet to be consulted what is Prime Minister became as usual what is where are they now between King and Cabinet, interpreting what is opinions and decisions of what is one to what is other. That has been one of his first functions where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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