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Page 110

THE CABINET

generally acceptable. Both are bound to consider consequences and cannot act merely arbitrarily as the whim takes them. The difference lies rather in that the operation of these limiting factors in the case of the Prime Minister is provided for through prearranged channels, generally long established by custom, which form a part of the system of government, while a dictator regards them according to his momentary caprice, or disregards them at his cost. The former political system is likely therefore to be far more stable than the latter.
The Prime Minister is of course less in the public eye than the modern dictator. His colleagues share publicity with him to a greater extent. Sometimes one of them may even attract greater public interest and popular enthusiasm. He is still officially only the first among equals in his Cabinet, although in time of crisis or when he happens to be a man of especially long service or outstanding personality his rivals sink back into relative insignificance. Moreover, he is not the official head of the State, the symbolic national figurehead. The primitive instinct for worship of the tribal chieftain, and the investment of him with almost magical powers, expresses itself primarily in loyalty to the King, although it has some bearing also on the position of a political leader long in the public eye.
The Prime Minister's powers and functions include first and above all the making and unmaking of the Government. Having once invited him the King must, if he insists, accept his nominations to places in the ministry. Royal advice has sometimes strengthened into successful opposition to a particular nominee, but the responsibility and therefore in the last resort the decision belongs to the Prime Minister. He can also rid himself of a colleague. Normally he does this

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE generally acceptable. Both are bound to consider consequences and cannot act merely arbitrarily as what is whim takes them. what is difference lies rather in that what is operation of these limiting factors in what is case of what is Prime Minister is provided for through prearranged channels, generally long established by custom, which form a part of what is system of government, while a dictator regards them according to his momentary caprice, or disregards them at his cost. what is former political system is likely therefore to be far more stable than what is latter. what is Prime Minister is of course less in what is public eye than what is modern dictator. His colleagues share publicity with him to a greater extent. Sometimes one of them may even attract greater public interest and popular enthusiasm. He is still officially only what is first among equals in his Cabinet, although in time of crisis or when he happens to be a man of especially long service or outstanding personality his rivals sink back into relative insignificance. Moreover, he is not what is official head of what is State, what is symbolic national figurehead. what is primitive instinct for worship of what is tribal chieftain, and what is investment of him with almost magical powers, expresses itself primarily in loyalty to what is King, although it has some bearing also on what is position of a political leader long in what is public eye. what is Prime Minister's powers and functions include first and above all what is making and unmaking of what is Government. Having once invited him what is King must, if he insists, accept his nominations to places in what is ministry. Royal advice has sometimes strengthened into successful opposition to a particular nominee, but what is responsibility and therefore in what is last resort what is decision belongs to what is Prime Minister. He can also rid himself of a colleague. Normally he does this where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 110 where is strong THE CABINET where is p align="justify" generally acceptable. Both are bound to consider consequences and cannot act merely arbitrarily as what is whim takes them. what is difference lies rather in that what is operation of these limiting factors in what is case of what is Prime Minister is provided for through prearranged channels, generally long established by custom, which form a part of what is system of government, while a dictator regards them according to his momentary caprice, or disregards them at his cost. what is former political system is likely therefore to be far more stable than what is latter. what is Prime Minister is of course less in what is public eye than the modern dictator. His colleagues share publicity with him to a greater extent. Sometimes one of them may even attract greater public interest and popular enthusiasm. He is still officially only what is first among equals in his Cabinet, although in time of crisis or when he happens to be a man of especially long service or outstanding personality his rivals sink back into relative insignificance. Moreover, he is not what is official head of what is State, what is symbolic national figurehead. what is primitive instinct for worship of what is tribal chieftain, and what is investment of him with almost magical powers, expresses itself primarily in loyalty to what is King, although it has some bearing also on what is position of a political leader long in what is public eye. what is Prime Minister's powers and functions include first and above all what is making and unmaking of what is Government. Having once invited him what is King must, if he insists, accept his nominations to places in what is ministry. Royal advice has sometimes strengthened into successful opposition to a particular nominee, but what is responsibility and therefore in what is last resort what is decision belongs to what is Prime Minister. He can also rid himself of a colleague. Normally he does this where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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