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Page 109

THE CABINET

and he is the master of the Government. In addition he is the chief Member of Parliament, being normally "leader of the House of Commons." His party, having a majority in that House, determines the action of Parliament, and he controls his party. Parliament can legally do anything and can actually do many things, and the Prime Minister decides its timetable, and can summon, prorogue, or dissolve it.
The Prime Minister's powers are enormous, but there is a sense in which it may be said that they belong to the office, not the man. The first way in which his position differs from that of a dictator lies not in the fact that he may be replaced, for a dictator may be also, but in the continuing preparation which is made through free and open criticism during his tenure of office for his replacement. While his office has become indispensable, he is not, and the system is so organised that a substitute for him can always be found whether by the action of the King, of his own parry, or of the Opposition. There is, however, an important proviso: the substitute must be able to control Parliament. He must normally, that is to say, be the leader of the majority parry, or a man whom a majority is prepared to follow. Since clearly this proviso seriously narrows the field from which a substitute can be drawn, it correspondingly increases his power by making him more difficult to replace. If the Prime Minister keeps the confidence of the majority he is as irremovable as a dictator.
Nor is it primarily because his powers are exercised differently that the Prime Minister's position is unlike that of a dictator. Both are leaders of a party holding a certain political philosophy, promoting certain lines of policy, acting in accordance with certain principles. Both must consult advisers and interests before they act, if their action is to prove

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and he is what is master of what is Government. In addition he is what is chief Member of Parliament, being normally "leader of what is House of Commons." His party, having a majority in that House, determines what is action of Parliament, and he controls his party. Parliament can legally do anything and can actually do many things, and what is Prime Minister decides its timetable, and can summon, prorogue, or dissolve it. what is Prime Minister's powers are enormous, but there is a sense in which it may be said that they belong to what is office, not what is man. what is first way in which his position differs from that of a dictator lies not in what is fact that he may be replaced, for a dictator may be also, but in what is continuing preparation which is made through free and open criticism during his tenure of office for his replacement. While his office has become indispensable, he is not, and what is system is so organised that a substitute for him can always be found whether by what is action of what is King, of his own parry, or of what is Opposition. There is, however, an important proviso: what is substitute must be able to control Parliament. He must normally, that is to say, be what is leader of what is majority parry, or a man whom a majority is prepared to follow. Since clearly this proviso seriously narrows what is field from which a substitute can be drawn, it correspondingly increases his power by making him more difficult to replace. If what is Prime Minister keeps what is confidence of what is majority he is as irremovable as a dictator. Nor is it primarily because his powers are exercised differently that what is Prime Minister's position is unlike that of a dictator. Both are leaders of a party holding a certain political philosophy, promoting certain lines of policy, acting in accordance with certain principles. Both must consult advisers and interests before they act, if their action is to prove where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 109 where is strong THE CABINET where is p align="justify" and he is what is master of what is Government. In addition he is what is chief Member of Parliament, being normally "leader of what is House of Commons." His party, having a majority in that House, determines what is action of Parliament, and he controls his party. Parliament can legally do anything and can actually do many things, and what is Prime Minister decides its timetable, and can summon, prorogue, or dissolve it. what is Prime Minister's powers are enormous, but there is a sense in which it may be said that they belong to what is office, not the man. what is first way in which his position differs from that of a dictator lies not in what is fact that he may be replaced, for a dictator may be also, but in what is continuing preparation which is made through free and open criticism during his tenure of office for his replacement. While his office has become indispensable, he is not, and what is system is so organised that a substitute for him can always be found whether by what is action of what is King, of his own parry, or of what is Opposition. There is, however, an important proviso: what is substitute must be able to control Parliament. He must normally, that is to say, be what is leader of what is majority parry, or a man whom a majority is prepared to follow. Since clearly this proviso seriously narrows what is field from which a substitute can be drawn, it correspondingly increases his power by making him more difficult to replace. If what is Prime Minister keeps what is confidence of what is majority he is as irremovable as a dictator. Nor is it primarily because his powers are exercised differently that what is Prime Minister's position is unlike that of a dictator. 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