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Page 108

THE CABINET

although with few exceptions the Prime Minister has adopted the principle that no names should be mentioned, he has not always applied it consistently. William IV seems to have received full information. So did Victoria when Melbourne and Disraeli were in office. On the other hand, Peel, Gladstone, and Asquith appear to have normally refrained from mentioning dissentients by name. The King is habitually told, however, of what shades of opinion were expressed at a Cabinet meeting. He has often succeeded in getting at the facts through lesser ministers. Victoria used Lord Granville and Rosebery to that end. Lord Esher used Morley and supplied Edward VII with the knowledge of disagreement which he thus obtained. Such detailed information may be of great importance as offering the King an opportunity to promote disagreement and assist the break-up of a government he dislikes. Lord Esher acted in this manner. George V spoke to Morley and Lord Crewe, endeavouring to secure their support within the Cabinet against presenting him with the unamended Home Rule Bill.(1)

III
The Prime Minister is far the most powerful man in the country. He is sometimes, and not without reason, likened to a dictator. His formal powers, at least, resemble closely those of an autocrat. The prerogatives lost by the monarch have fallen for the most part into his hands, as the chief responsible adviser of the Crown. Those which have not been inherited by him direct have gone to the Cabinet; but he is its leading member; he forms it; he can alter it or
destroy it. The Government is the master of the country

1 Lord Esher's Memoirs, Sunday Times, February 6, 1938.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE although with few exceptions what is Prime Minister has adopted what is principle that no names should be mentioned, he has not always applied it consistently. William IV seems to have received full information. So did Victoria when Melbourne and Disraeli were in office. On what is other hand, Peel, Gladstone, and Asquith appear to have normally refrained from mentioning dissentients by name. what is King is habitually told, however, of what shades of opinion were expressed at a Cabinet meeting. He has often succeeded in getting at what is facts through lesser ministers. Victoria used Lord Granville and Rosebery to that end. Lord Esher used Morley and supplied Edward VII with what is knowledge of disagreement which he thus obtained. Such detailed information may be of great importance as offering what is King an opportunity to promote disagreement and assist what is break-up of a government he dislikes. Lord Esher acted in this manner. George V spoke to Morley and Lord Crewe, endeavouring to secure their support within what is Cabinet against presenting him with what is unamended Home Rule Bill.(1) III what is Prime Minister is far what is most powerful man in what is country. He is sometimes, and not without reason, likened to a dictator. His formal powers, at least, resemble closely those of an autocrat. what is prerogatives lost by what is monarch have fallen for what is most part into his hands, as what is chief responsible adviser of what is Crown. Those which have not been inherited by him direct have gone to what is Cabinet; but he is its leading member; he forms it; he can alter it or destroy it. what is Government is what is master of what is country 1 Lord Esher's Memoirs, Sunday Times, February 6, 1938. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 108 where is strong THE CABINET where is p align="justify" although with few exceptions what is Prime Minister has adopted what is principle that no names should be mentioned, he has not always applied it consistently. William IV seems to have received full information. So did Victoria when Melbourne and Disraeli were in office. On what is other hand, Peel, Gladstone, and Asquith appear to have normally refrained from mentioning dissentients by name. what is King is habitually told, however, of what shades of opinion were expressed at a Cabinet meeting. He has often succeeded in getting at what is facts through lesser ministers. Victoria used Lord Granville and Rosebery to that end. Lord Esher used Morley and supplied Edward VII with what is knowledge of disagreement which he thus obtained. Such detailed information may be of great importance as offering what is King an opportunity to promote disagreement and assist what is break-up of a government he dislikes. Lord Esher acted in this manner. George V spoke to Morley and Lord Crewe, endeavouring to secure their support within what is Cabinet against presenting him with what is unamended Home Rule Bill.(1) where is strong III what is Prime Minister is far what is most powerful man in the country. He is sometimes, and not without reason, likened to a dictator. His formal powers, at least, resemble closely those of an autocrat. what is prerogatives lost by what is monarch have fallen for what is most part into his hands, as what is chief responsible adviser of what is Crown. Those which have not been inherited by him direct have gone to what is Cabinet; but he is its leading member; he forms it; he can alter it or destroy it. what is Government is what is master of what is country 1 Lord Esher's Memoirs, Sunday Times, February 6, 1938. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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