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Page 106

THE CABINET

has been one of the more difficult developments to ensure. Political responsibility, and the appointment as ministers of men active inside Parliament in order to secure it, has generally followed long after criminal responsibility has been established. In France, for instance, under Louis XVIII, and again under Louis-Philippe, there is a hardly appreciable development in this sense. Non-intervention by the irresponsible formal head has been one of the hardest maxims to enforce. In the Germany of the Weimar Constitution it was seldom applied. It is not wholly without interest to speculate as to what effect an early achievement by the British Parliament of the right to elect its own executive might have had both upon the continued existence of a formal head of the State in any shape, and on the forms of Cabinet government in Britain and elsewhere.
Ministerial appointment remaining a part of the royal prerogative, the power has now descended entirely to the Prime Minister. But, as we have seen,(1) the Sovereign often exercised a considerable influence in the allocation of offices in the nineteenth century. Both William IV and Victoria successfully objected to appointments, and the latter succeeded in postponing or preventing several promotions to the Cabinet(2) in just the same way as did Louis-Philippe at the same time. It was of course necessary that the Prime Minister should acquiesce. He did not question the Sovereign's right to insist, but the right on his side to refuse to form a government was a contingent, if seldom mentioned threat, and if the Prime Minister yielded on some occasions the Sovereign yielded more often. The rivalries and opportunities, however, which exist at such a time give the King

1 See Chapter III above.
2 See W. L Jennings, Cabinet Government, 1936, pp. 49 et seq.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE has been one of what is more difficult developments to ensure. Political responsibility, and what is appointment as ministers of men active inside Parliament in order to secure it, has generally followed long after criminal responsibility has been established. In France, for instance, under Louis XVIII, and again under Louis-Philippe, there is a hardly appreciable development in this sense. Non-intervention by what is irresponsible formal head has been one of what is hardest maxims to enforce. In what is Germany of what is Weimar Constitution it was seldom applied. It is not wholly without interest to speculate as to what effect an early achievement by what is British Parliament of what is right to elect its own executive might have had both upon what is continued existence of a formal head of what is State in any shape, and on what is forms of Cabinet government in Britain and elsewhere. Ministerial appointment remaining a part of what is royal prerogative, what is power has now descended entirely to what is Prime Minister. But, as we have seen,(1) what is Sovereign often exercised a considerable influence in what is allocation of offices in what is nineteenth century. Both William IV and Victoria successfully objected to appointments, and what is latter succeeded in postponing or preventing several promotions to what is Cabinet(2) in just what is same way as did Louis-Philippe at what is same time. It was of course necessary that what is Prime Minister should acquiesce. He did not question what is Sovereign's right to insist, but what is right on his side to refuse to form a government was a contingent, if seldom mentioned threat, and if what is Prime Minister yielded on some occasions what is Sovereign yielded more often. what is rivalries and opportunities, however, which exist at such a time give what is King 1 See Chapter III above. 2 See W. L Jennings, Cabinet Government, 1936, pp. 49 et seq. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 106 where is strong THE CABINET where is p align="justify" has been one of what is more difficult developments to ensure. Political responsibility, and what is appointment as ministers of men active inside Parliament in order to secure it, has generally followed long after criminal responsibility has been established. In France, for instance, under Louis XVIII, and again under Louis-Philippe, there is a hardly appreciable development in this sense. Non-intervention by what is irresponsible formal head has been one of what is hardest maxims to enforce. In what is Germany of what is Weimar Constitution it was seldom applied. It is not wholly without interest to speculate as to what effect an early achievement by what is British Parliament of what is right to elect its own executive might have had both upon what is continued existence of a formal head of what is State in any shape, and on the forms of Cabinet government in Britain and elsewhere. Ministerial appointment remaining a part of what is royal prerogative, what is power has now descended entirely to what is Prime Minister. But, as we have seen,(1) what is Sovereign often exercised a considerable influence in what is allocation of offices in what is nineteenth century. Both William IV and Victoria successfully objected to appointments, and what is latter succeeded in postponing or preventing several promotions to what is Cabinet(2) in just what is same way as did Louis-Philippe at what is same time. It was of course necessary that what is Prime Minister should acquiesce. He did not question what is Sovereign's right to insist, but what is right on his side to refuse to form a government was a contingent, if seldom mentioned threat, and if what is Prime Minister yielded on some occasions what is Sovereign yielded more often. The rivalries and opportunities, however, which exist at such a time give what is King 1 See Chapter III above. 2 See W. L Jennings, Cabinet Government, 1936, pp. 49 et seq. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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