Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 104

THE CABINET

function is the chief importance of the Cabinet. It is the supreme interpreter of majority opinion and it rules both majority and minority. Being responsible it must remember those to whom it will have to account in the future as well as those who entrusted it with power. It contains the most significant leaders of the party in power, who must be taken to represent the chief strands of opinion in that party, and so in their co-operation is the party's unity stabilised. These should be the men, too, most qualified to lead, when new direction must be given to policy and the majority persuaded to acceptance.

II
Understanding of the nature of Cabinet government was curiously slow to develop. The chief principles were built up slowly from experience. Parliament was for long hostile to the whole idea of a Cabinet. Queen Anne intensely disliked drawing her ministers from a single party because she understood that if they were united she was in their hands, but already in her time the Sovereign was being forced to do so. Two factors underlay this development. The first was the steadily increasing power of Parliament after 1689, and particularly of the House of Commons. This made it necessary that the ministers of the Crown should be in harmony with the lower House and able to control it. The second was the growth of parties, through which that power was organised and became effective. Throughout the eighteenth century the chief importance of this factor lay in that the ministers learnt the strength of unity. By presenting a united front to the King they could generally force him to accept their advice or to face the alternative of finding

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE function is what is chief importance of what is Cabinet. It is what is supreme interpreter of majority opinion and it rules both majority and minority. Being responsible it must remember those to whom it will have to account in what is future as well as those who entrusted it with power. It contains what is most significant leaders of what is party in power, who must be taken to represent what is chief strands of opinion in that party, and so in their co-operation is what is party's unity stabilised. These should be what is men, too, most qualified to lead, when new direction must be given to policy and what is majority persuaded to acceptance. II Understanding of what is nature of Cabinet government was curiously slow to develop. what is chief principles were built up slowly from experience. Parliament was for long hostile to what is whole idea of a Cabinet. Queen Anne intensely disliked drawing her ministers from a single party because she understood that if they were united she was in their hands, but already in her time what is Sovereign was being forced to do so. Two factors underlay this development. what is first was what is steadily increasing power of Parliament after 1689, and particularly of what is House of Commons. This made it necessary that what is ministers of what is Crown should be in harmony with what is lower House and able to control it. what is second was what is growth of parties, through which that power was organised and became effective. Throughout what is eighteenth century what is chief importance of this factor lay in that what is ministers learnt what is strength of unity. By presenting a united front to what is King they could generally force him to accept their advice or to face what is alternative of finding where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 104 where is strong THE CABINET where is p align="justify" function is what is chief importance of what is Cabinet. It is what is supreme interpreter of majority opinion and it rules both majority and minority. Being responsible it must remember those to whom it will have to account in what is future as well as those who entrusted it with power. It contains what is most significant leaders of what is party in power, who must be taken to represent the chief strands of opinion in that party, and so in their co-operation is what is party's unity stabilised. These should be what is men, too, most qualified to lead, when new direction must be given to policy and what is majority persuaded to acceptance. where is strong II Understanding of what is nature of Cabinet government was curiously slow to develop. what is chief principles were built up slowly from experience. Parliament was for long hostile to what is whole idea of a Cabinet. Queen Anne intensely disliked drawing her ministers from a single party because she understood that if they were united she was in their hands, but already in her time what is Sovereign was being forced to do so. Two factors underlay this development. The first was what is steadily increasing power of Parliament after 1689, and particularly of what is House of Commons. This made it necessary that what is ministers of what is Crown should be in harmony with what is lower House and able to control it. what is second was what is growth of parties, through which that power was organised and became effective. Throughout what is eighteenth century what is chief importance of this factor lay in that what is ministers learnt what is strength of unity. By presenting a united front to what is King they could generally force him to accept their advice or to face what is alternative of finding where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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