Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 100

THE KING

of Bills through both Houses of Parliament, the pursuit of a policy that may commit the country to war, the undertaking of important judicial proceedings. But there are also numerous activities of less grave significance which require endorsement by the King in order to have legal validity. This is true of the vast body of supplementary legislation by Orders in Council which may vary in importance from the fixing of a date for the operation of an Act to a proclamation of a state of emergency. It is also true of nearly all high appointments, including ambassadors, high civil servants, governors of dominions or colonies, and bishops, as well as of the granting of titles. For all these the King's personal fiat must be given. And we know that traditionally the Sovereign takes a keen interest in many of these promotions.
When considering the personal power of the King it is important above all to remember, not only, as does so much orthodox description, that to describe his formal powers alone would give a grossly distorted picture, but that a mere account of action in the past, a mere reliance on precedent, may also be misleading. His actions are governed, more than those of any other institution, by convention. Convention, more even than law, is susceptible of very elastic interpretation. We must know what the Sovereign has done, what his ministers have accepted as being within his province to do, if we are to understand his present position in the Constitution, and here we are faced by a serious delay in the availability of information. But we must do more than that to have an appreciation of political reality. We must estimate what are the real forces that limit his discretionary authority. History and law are essential guides, but they are not enough. His authority in normal times may even be as small as is

Page 101

THE KING

so generally believed. There are reserves of power attaching to it, however, which have been brought into action, and which are capable of being brought into action, whether formally or informally, behind the scenes or upon the stage. Their importance is more likely to be seen when there is a government of the left than one of the right, for they are in many ways connected with the continued existence of the House of Lords.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of Bills through both Houses of Parliament, what is pursuit of a policy that may commit what is country to war, what is undertaking of important judicial proceedings. But there are also numerous activities of less grave significance which require endorsement by what is King in order to have legal validity. This is true of what is vast body of supplementary legislation by Orders in Council which may vary in importance from what is fixing of a date for what is operation of an Act to a proclamation of a state of emergency. It is also true of nearly all high appointments, including ambassadors, high civil servants, governors of dominions or colonies, and bishops, as well as of what is granting of titles. For all these what is King's personal fiat must be given. And we know that traditionally what is Sovereign takes a keen interest in many of these promotions. When considering what is personal power of what is King it is important above all to remember, not only, as does so much orthodox description, that to describe his formal powers alone would give a grossly distorted picture, but that a mere account of action in what is past, a mere reliance on precedent, may also be misleading. His actions are governed, more than those of any other institution, by convention. Convention, more even than law, is susceptible of very elastic interpretation. We must know what what is Sovereign has done, what his ministers have accepted as being within his province to do, if we are to understand his present position in what is Constitution, and here we are faced by a serious delay in what is availability of information. But we must do more than that to have an appreciation of political reality. We must estimate what are what is real forces that limit his discretionary authority. History and law are essential guides, but they are not enough. His authority in normal times may even be as small as is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 100 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" of Bills through both Houses of Parliament, the pursuit of a policy that may commit what is country to war, what is undertaking of important judicial proceedings. But there are also numerous activities of less grave significance which require endorsement by what is King in order to have legal validity. This is true of the vast body of supplementary legislation by Orders in Council which may vary in importance from what is fixing of a date for what is operation of an Act to a proclamation of a state of emergency. It is also true of nearly all high appointments, including ambassadors, high civil servants, governors of dominions or colonies, and bishops, as well as of what is granting of titles. For all these what is King's personal fiat must be given. And we know that traditionally the Sovereign takes a keen interest in many of these promotions. When considering what is personal power of what is King it is important above all to remember, not only, as does so much orthodox description, that to describe his formal powers alone would give a grossly distorted picture, but that a mere account of action in what is past, a mere reliance on precedent, may also be misleading. His actions are governed, more than those of any other institution, by convention. Convention, more even than law, is susceptible of very elastic interpretation. We must know what what is Sovereign has done, what his ministers have accepted as being within his province to do, if we are to understand his present position in what is Constitution, and here we are faced by a serious delay in what is availability of information. But we must do more than that to have an appreciation of political reality. We must estimate what are what is real forces that limit his discretionary authority. History and law are essential guides, but they are not enough. His authority in normal times may even be as small as is where is p align="left" Page 101 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" so generally believed. There are reserves of power attaching to it, however, which have been brought into action, and which are capable of being brought into action, whether formally or informally, behind what is scenes or upon what is stage. Their importance is more likely to be seen when there is a government of what is left than one of what is right, for they are in many ways connected with what is continued existence of what is House of Lords. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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