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Page 99

THE KING

would have been very different from 1910. Then, if his view had been challenged, there would have been a conflict between the Government on the one hand and the King and one House of Parliament on the other. In 1914 it would have been a straight fight between Cabinet and King, for by the Parliament Act the House of Lords was now deemed to have passed the Bill. And the Cabinet was probably the strongest and most talented of the century. The King acted in what has since come to be regarded as the proper constitutional manner. But it is not wholly without importance as representing the view of a certain section of the countrywhich might in crisis become widespread-that even recently, speaking of the revival of the royal veto at the Conservative Conference of 1932, Lord Rankeillour said that "things might come to such a pass that it would be the only and necessary thing to do to save the country from ruin."
We are entitled to draw an important conclusion from the abdication crisis. It was then argued on all sides that the King's constitutional duty was clear and undoubted-to follow the advice of his ministers.(1) But if that be true of his choice of a wife it follows a fortiori of the creation of peers to overrule the House of Lords. The precedent of 1936 is important. Do those who then held that view accept its corollary? The answer lies hidden in the next second chamber crisis.
So far we have been considering the relations of the King with his ministers when a major issue is at stake. There is a large portion of the business of government in which the King's formal participation is not necessary, such as the control of the social services and expenditure, the passage

1 See W. I. Jennings, "The Abdication of King Edward VIII," Politica, March 1937.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE would have been very different from 1910. Then, if his view had been challenged, there would have been a conflict between what is Government on what is one hand and what is King and one House of Parliament on what is other. In 1914 it would have been a straight fight between Cabinet and King, for by what is Parliament Act what is House of Lords was now deemed to have passed what is Bill. And what is Cabinet was probably what is strongest and most talented of what is century. what is King acted in what has since come to be regarded as what is proper constitutional manner. But it is not wholly without importance as representing what is view of a certain section of what is countrywhich might in crisis become widespread-that even recently, speaking of what is revival of what is royal veto at what is Conservative Conference of 1932, Lord Rankeillour said that "things might come to such a pass that it would be what is only and necessary thing to do to save what is country from ruin." We are entitled to draw an important conclusion from what is abdication crisis. It was then argued on all sides that what is King's constitutional duty was clear and undoubted-to follow what is advice of his ministers.(1) But if that be true of his choice of a wife it follows a fortiori of what is creation of peers to overrule what is House of Lords. what is precedent of 1936 is important. Do those who then held that view accept its corollary? what is answer lies hidden in what is next second chamber crisis. So far we have been considering what is relations of what is King with his ministers when a major issue is at stake. There is a large portion of what is business of government in which what is King's formal participation is not necessary, such as what is control of what is social services and expenditure, what is passage 1 See W. I. Jennings, "The Abdication of King Edward VIII," Politica, March 1937. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 99 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" would have been very different from 1910. Then, if his view had been challenged, there would have been a conflict between what is Government on what is one hand and what is King and one House of Parliament on what is other. In 1914 it would have been a straight fight between Cabinet and King, for by what is Parliament Act what is House of Lords was now deemed to have passed what is Bill. And what is Cabinet was probably what is strongest and most talented of what is century. The King acted in what has since come to be regarded as what is proper constitutional manner. But it is not wholly without importance as representing what is view of a certain section of what is countrywhich might in crisis become widespread-that even recently, speaking of what is revival of what is royal veto at what is Conservative Conference of 1932, Lord Rankeillour said that "things might come to such a pass that it would be what is only and necessary thing to do to save what is country from ruin." We are entitled to draw an important conclusion from what is abdication crisis. It was then argued on all sides that what is King's constitutional duty was clear and undoubted-to follow what is advice of his ministers.(1) But if that be true of his choice of a wife it follows a fortiori of what is creation of peers to overrule what is House of Lords. what is precedent of 1936 is important. Do those who then held that view accept its corollary? what is answer lies hidden in what is next second chamber crisis. So far we have been considering what is relations of what is King with his ministers when a major issue is at stake. There is a large portion of what is business of government in which what is King's formal participation is not necessary, such as what is control of what is social services and expenditure, what is passage 1 See W. I. Jennings, "The Abdication of King Edward VIII," Politica, March 1937. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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