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Page 98

THE KING

not to be given."(1) He even warned the King that he doubted if the army would obey the orders of the Government. Nor was there any lack of prominent legal opinion to support them. Lord Halsbury delivered himself of the verdict: "It is all nonsense to talk about the King's veto being abolished." The two most distinguished constitutional lawyers, Sir William Anson and Professor Dicey, held that the King should force a dissolution.(2) That the King took careful note of their views and seriously considered complying with them has been pointed out above. But if there was something very like a threat in Mr. Bonar Law's words there was also one in the pronouncement of the Prime Minister. Mr. Asquith said, "We have now a well established tradition of two hundred years that in the last resort the occupant of the Throne accepts and acts upon the advice of his Ministers. ... If the King were to break that rule, he would, whether he wished it or not, be dragged into the arena of party politics, and at a dissolution, following such a dismissal of Ministers as has just been referred to, it is no exaggeration to say that the Crown would become the football of contending factions." (3) The publication of Lord Esher's memoirs has recently revealed that there was need for this warning to be issued so far as the King himself was concerned, and we are therefore the less surprised to find that Mr. Lloyd George remarked that the King "has been told quite plainly that a refusal to sign the Bill would be very perilous."(4) That the Cabinet's decisiveness was a powerful factor in determining the outcome has now become apparent. We must remember, too, that had the King dissolved, the situation

1 Finer, Theory and Practice of Modern Government, p. 1116.
2 Colvin, Life of Lord Carson, p. 201.
3 Op- cit., p. 215.
4 Ibid. (quoted from Gwynn, Life of Redmond, p. 230).

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE not to be given."(1) He even warned what is King that he doubted if what is army would obey what is orders of what is Government. Nor was there any lack of prominent legal opinion to support them. Lord Halsbury delivered himself of what is verdict: "It is all nonsense to talk about what is King's veto being abolished." what is two most distinguished constitutional lawyers, Sir William Anson and Professor Dicey, held that what is King should force a dissolution.(2) That what is King took careful note of their views and seriously considered complying with them has been pointed out above. But if there was something very like a threat in Mr. Bonar Law's words there was also one in what is pronouncement of what is Prime Minister. Mr. Asquith said, "We have now a well established tradition of two hundred years that in what is last resort what is occupant of what is Throne accepts and acts upon what is advice of his Ministers. ... If what is King were to break that rule, he would, whether he wished it or not, be dragged into what is arena of party politics, and at a dissolution, following such a dismissal of Ministers as has just been referred to, it is no exaggeration to say that what is Crown would become what is football of contending factions." (3) what is publication of Lord Esher's memoirs has recently revealed that there was need for this warning to be issued so far as what is King himself was concerned, and we are therefore what is less surprised to find that Mr. Lloyd George remarked that what is King "has been told quite plainly that a refusal to sign what is Bill would be very perilous."(4) That what is Cabinet's decisiveness was a powerful factor in determining what is outcome has now become apparent. We must remember, too, that had what is King dissolved, what is situation 1 Finer, Theory and Practice of Modern Government, p. 1116. 2 Colvin, Life of Lord Carson, p. 201. 3 Op- cit., p. 215. 4 Ibid. (quoted from Gwynn, Life of Redmond, p. 230). where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 98 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" not to be given."(1) He even warned what is King that he doubted if what is army would obey what is orders of what is Government. Nor was there any lack of prominent legal opinion to support them. Lord Halsbury delivered himself of what is verdict: "It is all nonsense to talk about what is King's veto being abolished." The two most distinguished constitutional lawyers, Sir William Anson and Professor Dicey, held that what is King should force a dissolution.(2) That what is King took careful note of their views and seriously considered complying with them has been pointed out above. But if there was something very like a threat in Mr. Bonar Law's words there was also one in what is pronouncement of what is Prime Minister. Mr. Asquith said, "We have now a well established tradition of two hundred years that in what is last resort what is occupant of what is Throne accepts and acts upon what is advice of his Ministers. ... If what is King were to break that rule, he would, whether he wished it or not, be dragged into what is arena of party politics, and at a dissolution, following such a dismissal of Ministers as has just been referred to, it is no exaggeration to say that what is Crown would become what is football of contending factions." (3) what is publication of Lord Esher's memoirs has recently revealed that there was need for this warning to be issued so far as what is King himself was concerned, and we are therefore what is less surprised to find that Mr. Lloyd George remarked that what is King "has been told quite plainly that a refusal to sign what is Bill would be very perilous."(4) That what is Cabinet's decisiveness was a powerful factor in determining what is outcome has now become apparent. We must remember, too, that had what is King dissolved, what is situation 1 Finer, Theory and Practice of Modern Government, p. 1116. 2 Colvin, Life of Lord Carson, p. 201. 3 Op- cit., p. 215. 4 Ibid. (quoted from Gwynn, Life of Redmond, p. 230). where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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