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Page 97

THE KING

even when they had the support of the Commons.(1) Dr. Jennings' remark of the dismissal of Melbourne that "the whole atmosphere is that of the eighteenth century" might also be applied to this "precedent."
When in 1913 and 1914 the Home Rule Bill was about to become law through the operation of the Parliament Act, we find the same anxiety of the Conservative Party in Opposition to make use of the royal prerogative in the party interest. The claim was not dissimilar from that accepted by King Edward and King George in the House of Lords crisis. It asserted the principle that the electorate must be consulted on the specific issue of Home Rule, relying on the royal prerogative of dissolution for that purpose. "Most of the elder statesmen were now contributing their opinions about the possible action of the Crown within the limits of the Constitution. All strove to be impartial, but as the records shew, their views of what the Crown might do were generally in accord with what they wished it to do. Lord Lansdowne was strong on the theory that, since the Parliament Act had destroyed the power hitherto inherent in the House of Lords to kill a Bill and compel an election, that power now belonged to the Crown alone." Mr. Balfour thought that "if the King addressed a letter to his subjects explaining the ground on which he took action and his readiness to abide by the result, he would suffer no damage ... whatever that result might be."(2) Mr. Bonar Law said that if the King "did give his assent to it (the Home Rule Bill) then one half of his people would say ... that in such circumstances the assent ought

1 W. I. Jennings, Cabinet Government, p. 321, and also Spender and Asquith, Life of flsquith, vol. i, p. 3 19.
2 Spender and Asquith, Life of Lord Oxford and rlsquizh, vol. ii, p. 25.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE even when they had what is support of what is Commons.(1) Dr. Jennings' remark of what is dismissal of Melbourne that "the whole atmosphere is that of what is eighteenth century" might also be applied to this "precedent." When in 1913 and 1914 what is Home Rule Bill was about to become law through what is operation of what is Parliament Act, we find what is same anxiety of what is Conservative Party in Opposition to make use of what is royal prerogative in what is party interest. what is claim was not dissimilar from that accepted by King Edward and King George in what is House of Lords crisis. It asserted what is principle that what is electorate must be consulted on what is specific issue of Home Rule, relying on what is royal prerogative of dissolution for that purpose. "Most of what is elder statesmen were now contributing their opinions about what is possible action of what is Crown within what is limits of what is Constitution. All strove to be impartial, but as what is records shew, their views of what what is Crown might do were generally in accord with what they wished it to do. Lord Lansdowne was strong on what is theory that, since what is Parliament Act had destroyed what is power hitherto inherent in what is House of Lords to stop a Bill and compel an election, that power now belonged to what is Crown alone." Mr. Balfour thought that "if what is King addressed a letter to his subjects explaining what is ground on which he took action and his readiness to abide by what is result, he would suffer no damage ... whatever that result might be."(2) Mr. Bonar Law said that if what is King "did give his assent to it (the Home Rule Bill) then one half of his people would say ... that in such circumstances what is assent ought 1 W. I. Jennings, Cabinet Government, p. 321, and also Spender and Asquith, Life of flsquith, vol. i, p. 3 19. 2 Spender and Asquith, Life of Lord Oxford and rlsquizh, vol. ii, p. 25. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 97 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" even when they had what is support of what is Commons.(1) Dr. Jennings' remark of what is dismissal of Melbourne that "the whole atmosphere is that of what is eighteenth century" might also be applied to this "precedent." When in 1913 and 1914 what is Home Rule Bill was about to become law through what is operation of what is Parliament Act, we find what is same anxiety of what is Conservative Party in Opposition to make use of what is royal prerogative in what is party interest. what is claim was not dissimilar from that accepted by King Edward and King George in what is House of Lords crisis. It asserted what is principle that what is electorate must be consulted on what is specific issue of Home Rule, relying on what is royal prerogative of dissolution for that purpose. "Most of what is elder statesmen were now contributing their opinions about what is possible action of what is Crown within what is limits of what is Constitution. All strove to be impartial, but as what is records shew, their views of what what is Crown might do were generally in accord with what they wished it to do. Lord Lansdowne was strong on what is theory that, since what is Parliament Act had destroyed what is power hitherto inherent in what is House of Lords to stop a Bill and compel an election, that power now belonged to what is Crown alone." Mr. Balfour thought that "if what is King addressed a letter to his subjects explaining what is ground on which he took action and his readiness to abide by what is result, he would suffer no damage ... whatever that result might be."(2) Mr. Bonar Law said that if what is King "did give his assent to it (the Home Rule Bill) then one half of his people would say ... that in such circumstances what is assent ought 1 W. I. Jennings, Cabinet Government, p. 321, and also Spender and Asquith, Life of flsquith, vol. i, p. 3 19. 2 Spender and Asquith, Life of Lord Oxford and rlsquizh, vol. ii, p. 25. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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