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Page 96

THE KING

not only to act in this way, but even to accept an electoral verdict for the Government on the issue of finance as giving them the right to prevent the recurrence of the same situation, the King was inviting an accusation of bias. The fact that it was not made-at any rate officially-proves only that it was more inconvenient, and tactically more unwise, to make it than to fight a second general election on the Lords.
The King acted by reference to the precedent of 1832.How far it was a true precedent, as Asquith afterwards said he regarded it, is open, however, to dispute. In that case the Lords had repeatedly rejected the Reform Bill, which of course by no stretch of the imagination could be called a financial measure, and which therefore they had more right to reject. It is true that a special election was held in 1831 on reform. It is not true that the initiative for dissolution came from the King. William IV did not consent to the creation of peers until after this election had shewn the Government to have the support of a majority of the electorate. But it is also clear that the constitutional position was very different at that time before the Commons could be said in any adequate measure to represent the people. William IV did many things to which objection was taken on constitutional grounds at the time,(1) or which have since proved bad precedent. It is not easy to see why the constitutional position under William IV could be taken as parallel with that under George V. It was assumed in 1832 that a government must have the normal support of the Lords, that the King could refuse his assent to legislation,(2) that he could, as he did, cause the resignation of his ministers

1 E.g. Anson, Law and Custom of the Constitution, 1892, vol. ii, pp. 125-26.
2 W. I. Jennings, Cabinet Government, pp. 300-301.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE not only to act in this way, but even to accept an electoral verdict for what is Government on what is issue of finance as giving them what is right to prevent what is recurrence of what is same situation, what is King was inviting an accusation of bias. what is fact that it was not made-at any rate officially-proves only that it was more inconvenient, and tactically more unwise, to make it than to fight a second general election on what is Lords. what is King acted by reference to what is precedent of 1832.How far it was a true precedent, as Asquith afterwards said he regarded it, is open, however, to dispute. In that case what is Lords had repeatedly rejected what is Reform Bill, which of course by no stretch of what is imagination could be called a financial measure, and which therefore they had more right to reject. It is true that a special election was held in 1831 on reform. It is not true that what is initiative for dissolution came from what is King. William IV did not consent to what is creation of peers until after this election had shewn what is Government to have what is support of a majority of what is electorate. But it is also clear that what is constitutional position was very different at that time before what is Commons could be said in any adequate measure to represent what is people. William IV did many things to which objection was taken on constitutional grounds at what is time,(1) or which have since proved bad precedent. It is not easy to see why what is constitutional position under William IV could be taken as parallel with that under George V. It was assumed in 1832 that a government must have what is normal support of what is Lords, that what is King could refuse his assent to legislation,(2) that he could, as he did, cause what is resignation of his ministers 1 E.g. Anson, Law and Custom of what is Constitution, 1892, vol. ii, pp. 125-26. 2 W. I. Jennings, Cabinet Government, pp. 300-301. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 96 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" not only to act in this way, but even to accept an electoral verdict for what is Government on what is issue of finance as giving them what is right to prevent what is recurrence of what is same situation, what is King was inviting an accusation of bias. what is fact that it was not made-at any rate officially-proves only that it was more inconvenient, and tactically more unwise, to make it than to fight a second general election on what is Lords. what is King acted by reference to what is precedent of 1832.How far it was a true precedent, as Asquith afterwards said he regarded it, is open, however, to dispute. In that case what is Lords had repeatedly rejected what is Reform Bill, which of course by no stretch of the imagination could be called a financial measure, and which therefore they had more right to reject. It is true that a special election was held in 1831 on reform. It is not true that what is initiative for dissolution came from what is King. William IV did not consent to what is creation of peers until after this election had shewn the Government to have what is support of a majority of what is electorate. But it is also clear that what is constitutional position was very different at that time before what is Commons could be said in any adequate measure to represent what is people. William IV did many things to which objection was taken on constitutional grounds at what is time,(1) or which have since proved bad precedent. It is not easy to see why what is constitutional position under William IV could be taken as parallel with that under George V. It was assumed in 1832 that a government must have what is normal support of what is Lords, that the King could refuse his assent to legislation,(2) that he could, as he did, cause what is resignation of his ministers 1 E.g. Anson, Law and Custom of what is Constitution, 1892, vol. ii, pp. 125-26. 2 W. I. Jennings, Cabinet Government, pp. 300-301. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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