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Page 95

THE KING

tage of the House of Lords, in fact that he was accepting the Conservative Party's view in full. "The King regards the policy of the Government," Asquith was told,(1) "as tantamount to the destruction of the House of Lords." It is interesting to note that the policy was the very moderate one which later became the Parliament Act. It was largely because King Edward regarded the maintenance of a privileged hereditary nobility as necessary to the monarchy,(2) because he thought that "the House of Lords, like the Crown itself, should be above the attacks of party politicians,"(3) that he felt called upon to defend the peers, and constantly to reprove ministers for their speeches on the subject.(4) It was more to the flooding of the hereditary peerage than to the over-ruling of the Lords that the King was opposed, for "his objection to the creation of Peers would be 'considerably diminished' if Life Peers could be created."(5) The King seems to have gone far in his defence of the Lords, yet his action has been accepted as constitutionally correct. The intervention of the House of Lords was a revolution in constitutional practice. Had the King agreed to an immediate threat to create peers he would have been acting in defence of that constitutional practice. There was some justification in precedent, whether the creation of peers in 1712 or the threat to do so in 1832, for such a course of action, which would certainly have received the endorsement of those who saw the constitution with Bagehot's eyes. The responsibility would have been his ministers', and the King would not have laid himself open to attack. By proving himself-unwilling

1 Spender and Asquith, Zife of Lord Oxford and Asquizh, vol. i, p. 261.
2 J. A. Spender, Life of Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman, vol. ii,
p. 317, also, Lee, Life of King Edward VII, vol. ii, p. 455.
3 Lee, op. cit., vol. ii, p. 455.
4 Ibid., vol. ii, pp. 313 and 456.
5 Spender and Asquith, Life of Asquith, vol. i, p, 262.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE tage of what is House of Lords, in fact that he was accepting what is Conservative Party's view in full. "The King regards what is policy of what is Government," Asquith was told,(1) "as tantamount to what is destruction of what is House of Lords." It is interesting to note that what is policy was what is very moderate one which later became what is Parliament Act. It was largely because King Edward regarded what is maintenance of a privileged hereditary nobility as necessary to what is monarchy,(2) because he thought that "the House of Lords, like what is Crown itself, should be above what is attacks of party politicians,"(3) that he felt called upon to defend what is peers, and constantly to reprove ministers for their speeches on what is subject.(4) It was more to what is flooding of what is hereditary peerage than to what is over-ruling of what is Lords that what is King was opposed, for "his objection to what is creation of Peers would be 'considerably diminished' if Life Peers could be created."(5) what is King seems to have gone far in his defence of what is Lords, yet his action has been accepted as constitutionally correct. what is intervention of what is House of Lords was a revolution in constitutional practice. Had what is King agreed to an immediate threat to create peers he would have been acting in defence of that constitutional practice. There was some justification in precedent, whether what is creation of peers in 1712 or what is threat to do so in 1832, for such a course of action, which would certainly have received what is endorsement of those who saw what is constitution with Bagehot's eyes. what is responsibility would have been his ministers', and what is King would not have laid himself open to attack. By proving himself-unwilling 1 Spender and Asquith, Zife of Lord Oxford and Asquizh, vol. i, p. 261. 2 J. A. Spender, Life of Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman, vol. ii, p. 317, also, Lee, Life of King Edward VII, vol. ii, p. 455. 3 Lee, op. cit., vol. ii, p. 455. 4 Ibid., vol. ii, pp. 313 and 456. 5 Spender and Asquith, Life of Asquith, vol. i, p, 262. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 95 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" tage of what is House of Lords, in fact that he was accepting what is Conservative Party's view in full. "The King regards what is policy of what is Government," Asquith was told,(1) "as tantamount to what is destruction of what is House of Lords." It is interesting to note that what is policy was what is very moderate one which later became what is Parliament Act. It was largely because King Edward regarded what is maintenance of a privileged hereditary nobility as necessary to what is monarchy,(2) because he thought that "the House of Lords, like what is Crown itself, should be above what is attacks of party politicians,"(3) that he felt called upon to defend what is peers, and constantly to reprove ministers for their speeches on what is subject.(4) It was more to what is flooding of what is hereditary peerage than to what is over-ruling of what is Lords that what is King was opposed, for "his objection to what is creation of Peers would be 'considerably diminished' if Life Peers could be created."(5) what is King seems to have gone far in his defence of what is Lords, yet his action has been accepted as constitutionally correct. what is intervention of what is House of Lords was a revolution in constitutional practice. Had what is King agreed to an immediate threat to create peers he would have been acting in defence of that constitutional practice. There was some justification in precedent, whether what is creation of peers in 1712 or what is threat to do so in 1832, for such a course of action, which would certainly have received what is endorsement of those who saw what is constitution with Bagehot's eyes. what is responsibility would have been his ministers', and what is King would not have laid himself open to attack. By proving himself-unwilling 1 Spender and Asquith, Zife of Lord Oxford and Asquizh, vol. i, p. 261. 2 J. A. Spender, Life of Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman, vol. ii, p. 317, also, Lee, Life of King Edward VII, vol. ii, p. 455. 3 Lee, op. cit., vol. ii, p. 455. 4 Ibid., vol. ii, pp. 313 and 456. 5 Spender and Asquith, Life of Asquith, vol. i, p, 262. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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