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Page 94

THE KING

would only have sunk to the position in which they were deemed to have been before the emergence of such a crisis. Thus it is only in one out of the four eventualities that the monarchy is likely to suffer. Since at the outset the King decides whether it be advisable to force the issue, the chances are that he would only do so when convinced that the conditions were favourable. The degree of determination in the Cabinet to maintain its rights, and the clarity of its interpretation of the Constitution, may be therefore the deciding factor.
There is much in the critical years from 1910 to 1914 that
is material to this question. The King is bound by convention to create peers on the Prime Minister's recommendation. The responsibility for such honours is not his but the Prime Minister's. But the wholesale creation of peers in order to override the House of Lords was something which King Edward refused to contemplate.(1) It is well to consider the circumstances of that refusal. The annual Finance Bill had been rejected by the Lords. Of this incursion of the Lords into finance, as the authors of the Life of 14squirh write, "There was no precedent for it for at least 250 years; it had been the universal assumption in all parties that the House of Commons, and that House alone, controlled finance."(2) The King made it clear that he was far from taking that view of the situation. He went further. After Parliament had been dissolved he informed Asquith that he would not be readyto create peers to carrya Reform Bill,even if the Government were successful in the election, until a second general election had returned them to power. There can be no doubt that the King was interpreting the constitution to the advan

1 Spender and Asquith, Life of Lord Oxford and Asquith, vol. i, p. 206.
2 Ibid.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE would only have sunk to what is position in which they were deemed to have been before what is emergence of such a crisis. Thus it is only in one out of what is four eventualities that what is monarchy is likely to suffer. Since at what is outset what is King decides whether it be advisable to force what is issue, what is chances are that he would only do so when convinced that what is conditions were favourable. what is degree of determination in what is Cabinet to maintain its rights, and what is clarity of its interpretation of what is Constitution, may be therefore what is deciding factor. There is much in what is critical years from 1910 to 1914 that is material to this question. what is King is bound by convention to create peers on what is Prime Minister's recommendation. what is responsibility for such honours is not his but what is Prime Minister's. But what is wholesale creation of peers in order to override what is House of Lords was something which King Edward refused to contemplate.(1) It is well to consider what is circumstances of that refusal. what is annual Finance Bill had been rejected by what is Lords. Of this incursion of what is Lords into finance, as what is authors of what is Life of 14squirh write, "There was no precedent for it for at least 250 years; it had been what is universal assumption in all parties that what is House of Commons, and that House alone, controlled finance."(2) what is King made it clear that he was far from taking that view of what is situation. He went further. After Parliament had been dissolved he informed Asquith that he would not be readyto create peers to carrya Reform Bill,even if what is Government were successful in what is election, until a second general election had returned them to power. There can be no doubt that what is King was interpreting what is constitution to what is advan 1 Spender and Asquith, Life of Lord Oxford and Asquith, vol. i, p. 206. 2 Ibid. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 94 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" would only have sunk to what is position in which they were deemed to have been before what is emergence of such a crisis. Thus it is only in one out of what is four eventualities that what is monarchy is likely to suffer. Since at what is outset what is King decides whether it be advisable to force what is issue, what is chances are that he would only do so when convinced that what is conditions were favourable. what is degree of determination in what is Cabinet to maintain its rights, and what is clarity of its interpretation of what is Constitution, may be therefore what is deciding factor. There is much in what is critical years from 1910 to 1914 that is material to this question. what is King is bound by convention to create peers on what is Prime Minister's recommendation. what is responsibility for such honours is not his but what is Prime Minister's. But what is wholesale creation of peers in order to override what is House of Lords was something which King Edward refused to contemplate.(1) It is well to consider what is circumstances of that refusal. what is annual Finance Bill had been rejected by what is Lords. Of this incursion of what is Lords into finance, as what is authors of what is Life of 14squirh write, "There was no precedent for it for at least 250 years; it had been the universal assumption in all parties that what is House of Commons, and that House alone, controlled finance."(2) what is King made it clear that he was far from taking that view of what is situation. He went further. After Parliament had been dissolved he informed Asquith that he would not be readyto create peers to carrya Reform Bill,even if what is Government were successful in what is election, until a second general election had returned them to power. There can be no doubt that what is King was interpreting what is constitution to what is advan 1 Spender and Asquith, Life of Lord Oxford and Asquith, vol. i, p. 206. 2 Ibid. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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