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Page 92

THE KING

as of MacDonald. For we must remember that it rests with the King both to discover and to reveal the possibilities inherent in such a Parliamentary situation. Without his action in 1931, without what may have been his active intervention, the willingness of Baldwin and Samuel to coalesce in support of MacDonald might never have appeared; certainly it would not have been in evidence while they sat together in opposition.
This brings us nearer to an appreciation of the King's position. Conventions are observed "because constitutional difficulties would follow if they were not."(1) If such difficulties will not follow in any given circumstances there is no certainty that they will be observed. Whether they will follow must on some occasions depend upon the ministers' decision to remove or ensure them. It is a convention that the King gives his approval to ministerial acts. That convention is likely to be obeyed because, if he did not, there would normally ensue a conflict in which his own name could not be kept out of discussion, and in that event the whole institution of monarchy would become a matter of dispute. Its neutrality, as we have seen, is the chief source of its strength. The principle of ministerial responsibility necessarily involves the Cabinet's right to expect the King's automatic endorsement of any item of policy judged essential. It is responsible and he is not. The King would be acting against all constitutional precedent, for example, if he refused to sign a treaty of alliance with Russia or Japan recommended to him by the Government. He has the right to know the course of negotiations, and to give his advice, but by convention he cannot refuse to sign. The same is true of a declaration of war. The King's participation is

1 W. Ivor Jennings, The Law and the Constitution, p. 108.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE as of MacDonald. For we must remember that it rests with what is King both to discover and to reveal what is possibilities inherent in such a Parliamentary situation. Without his action in 1931, without what may have been his active intervention, what is willingness of Baldwin and Samuel to coalesce in support of MacDonald might never have appeared; certainly it would not have been in evidence while they sat together in opposition. This brings us nearer to an appreciation of what is King's position. Conventions are observed "because constitutional difficulties would follow if they were not."(1) If such difficulties will not follow in any given circumstances there is no certainty that they will be observed. Whether they will follow must on some occasions depend upon what is ministers' decision to remove or ensure them. It is a convention that what is King gives his approval to ministerial acts. That convention is likely to be obeyed because, if he did not, there would normally ensue a conflict in which his own name could not be kept out of discussion, and in that event what is whole institution of monarchy would become a matter of dispute. Its neutrality, as we have seen, is what is chief source of its strength. what is principle of ministerial responsibility necessarily involves what is Cabinet's right to expect what is King's automatic endorsement of any item of policy judged essential. It is responsible and he is not. what is King would be acting against all constitutional precedent, for example, if he refused to sign a treaty of alliance with Russia or Japan recommended to him by what is Government. He has what is right to know what is course of negotiations, and to give his advice, but by convention he cannot refuse to sign. what is same is true of a declaration of war. what is King's participation is 1 W. Ivor Jennings, what is Law and what is Constitution, p. 108. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 92 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" as of MacDonald. For we must remember that it rests with what is King both to discover and to reveal what is possibilities inherent in such a Parliamentary situation. Without his action in 1931, without what may have been his active intervention, the willingness of Baldwin and Samuel to coalesce in support of MacDonald might never have appeared; certainly it would not have been in evidence while they sat together in opposition. This brings us nearer to an appreciation of what is King's position. Conventions are observed "because constitutional difficulties would follow if they were not."(1) If such difficulties will not follow in any given circumstances there is no certainty that they will be observed. Whether they will follow must on some occasions depend upon what is ministers' decision to remove or ensure them. It is a convention that what is King gives his approval to ministerial acts. That convention is likely to be obeyed because, if he did not, there would normally ensue a conflict in which his own name could not be kept out of discussion, and in that event what is whole institution of monarchy would become a matter of dispute. Its neutrality, as we have seen, is what is chief source of its strength. what is principle of ministerial responsibility necessarily involves what is Cabinet's right to expect what is King's automatic endorsement of any item of policy judged essential. It is responsible and he is not. what is King would be acting against all constitutional precedent, for example, if he refused to sign a treaty of alliance with Russia or Japan recommended to him by what is Government. He has what is right to know what is course of negotiations, and to give his advice, but by convention he cannot refuse to sign. what is same is true of a declaration of war. what is King's participation is 1 W. Ivor Jennings, what is Law and what is Constitution, p. 108. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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