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Page 91

THE KING

possibility of more than one leader being available from a given party, or the chances of a coalition being formed under the persuasion of the King or the politician to whom he offers the task of forming a Government. Nor does it allow for the intangible but none the less real influence of the fait accompli upon the electorate. It is easy, for instance, to imagine circumstances in which a new Cabinet without an established position in the Commons could appeal successfully to the electorate, although an alternative could have been found without a general election. To some extent 1931 was an illustrationof this. Themere fact of being the Government with a clean slate and an untried policy, and the prestige derived from selection by the King in a time of emergency and from agreement to coalesce, would rally a large part of the floating vote. And success would justify the King's action; indeed it would probably increase the prestige of the monarchy. But, on the other hand, it must not be imagined that the failure of such a government to win a majority at the elections would necessarily reflect any discredit on the King. Had the MacDonald coalition lost its majority at the election there would still have been few to dispute either the King's right to call upon MacDonald or his wisdom in doing so. Nor would a similar failure of Henderson have reacted to the detriment of the King. There would have been few to question the King's authority, on accepting MacDonald's resignation, to consult with prominent politicians in the Labour as well as other parties. That would have revealed to him the realities of the Parliamentary situation. A strict pursuit of the principle laid down by the Prince Consort, or the often-accepted view of the automatic right of the strongest party in the Commons, would clearly have provided as good a justification for the choice of Henderson

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE possibility of more than one leader being available from a given party, or what is chances of a coalition being formed under what is persuasion of what is King or what is politician to whom he offers what is task of forming a Government. Nor does it allow for what is intangible but none what is less real influence of what is fait accompli upon what is electorate. It is easy, for instance, to imagine circumstances in which a new Cabinet without an established position in what is Commons could appeal successfully to what is electorate, although an alternative could have been found without a general election. To some extent 1931 was an illustrationof this. Themere fact of being what is Government with a clean slate and an untried policy, and what is prestige derived from selection by what is King in a time of emergency and from agreement to coalesce, would rally a large part of what is floating vote. And success would justify what is King's action; indeed it would probably increase what is prestige of what is monarchy. But, on what is other hand, it must not be imagined that what is failure of such a government to win a majority at what is elections would necessarily reflect any discredit on what is King. Had what is MacDonald coalition lost its majority at what is election there would still have been few to dispute either what is King's right to call upon MacDonald or his wisdom in doing so. Nor would a similar failure of Henderson have reacted to what is detriment of what is King. There would have been few to question what is King's authority, on accepting MacDonald's resignation, to consult with prominent politicians in what is Labour as well as other parties. That would have revealed to him what is realities of what is Parliamentary situation. A strict pursuit of what is principle laid down by what is Prince Consort, or what is often-accepted view of what is automatic right of what is strongest party in what is Commons, would clearly have provided as good a justification for what is choice of Henderson where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 91 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" possibility of more than one leader being available from a given party, or what is chances of a coalition being formed under what is persuasion of what is King or what is politician to whom he offers what is task of forming a Government. Nor does it allow for what is intangible but none what is less real influence of what is fait accompli upon the electorate. It is easy, for instance, to imagine circumstances in which a new Cabinet without an established position in what is Commons could appeal successfully to what is electorate, although an alternative could have been found without a general election. To some extent 1931 was an illustrationof this. Themere fact of being what is Government with a clean slate and an untried policy, and what is prestige derived from selection by what is King in a time of emergency and from agreement to coalesce, would rally a large part of what is floating vote. And success would justify what is King's action; indeed it would probably increase what is prestige of what is monarchy. But, on what is other hand, it must not be imagined that what is failure of such a government to win a majority at what is elections would necessarily reflect any discredit on what is King. Had what is MacDonald coalition lost its majority at the election there would still have been few to dispute either the King's right to call upon MacDonald or his wisdom in doing so. Nor would a similar failure of Henderson have reacted to what is detriment of what is King. There would have been few to question what is King's authority, on accepting MacDonald's resignation, to consult with prominent politicians in what is Labour as well as other parties. That would have revealed to him what is realities of what is Parliamentary situation. A strict pursuit of what is principle laid down by what is Prince Consort, or what is often-accepted view of what is automatic right of what is strongest party in what is Commons, would clearly have provided as good a justification for what is choice of Henderson where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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