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Page 90

THE KING

of voters behind the Government of the King's choice is held to vindicate the constitutionality of that choice. That is a conclusion which it seems difficult to escape.
But there are limits to the King's freedom in choosing a Prime Minister. He could not have selected anyone but Mr. Baldwin in 1925. He must avoid the appearance of bias which would have been involved in the formation of an anti-Labour coalition in 1929, for although such a combination would have commanded a majority of the Commons and an electoral majority of something like five million votes, it might have appeared as the retention of office by an electorally discredited administration, and have been attacked by Labour as a clear refusal to it of the fruits of success at the polls. But even in that event the King's position would have been guarded. By the acceptance of office in 1929 Mr. Baldwin or Mr. Lloyd George as the leader of a coalition government would have assumed responsibility for the King's selection of them, and there can be little doubt that the larger portion of the public would have endorsed the King's action, provided the Government had been successful for a time in retaining the confidence of Parliament. We see, therefore, that the old view of the royal participation in the selection of a government as a purely automatic choice of the leader of the biggest party is an over-simplified one. That view has been generally held. We find it expressed in a memorandum of the Prince Consort of 1851, noting agreement between Lord Lansdowne and himself that "the Queen should be entirely guided in her choice of the person to construct a government by the consideration which party would now appear to be the strongest in the House of Commons."(1) But that view does not take into account the

1 Queen Victoria's Letters, vol. ii, p. 373 (first series).

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of voters behind what is Government of what is King's choice is held to vindicate what is constitutionality of that choice. That is a conclusion which it seems difficult to escape. But there are limits to what is King's freedom in choosing a Prime Minister. He could not have selected anyone but Mr. Baldwin in 1925. He must avoid what is appearance of bias which would have been involved in what is formation of an anti-Labour coalition in 1929, for although such a combination would have commanded a majority of what is Commons and an electoral majority of something like five million votes, it might have appeared as what is retention of office by an electorally discredited administration, and have been attacked by Labour as a clear refusal to it of what is fruits of success at what is polls. But even in that event what is King's position would have been guarded. By what is acceptance of office in 1929 Mr. Baldwin or Mr. Lloyd George as what is leader of a coalition government would have assumed responsibility for what is King's selection of them, and there can be little doubt that what is larger portion of what is public would have endorsed what is King's action, provided what is Government had been successful for a time in retaining what is confidence of Parliament. We see, therefore, that what is old view of what is royal participation in what is selection of a government as a purely automatic choice of what is leader of what is biggest party is an over-simplified one. That view has been generally held. We find it expressed in a memorandum of what is Prince Consort of 1851, noting agreement between Lord Lansdowne and himself that "the Queen should be entirely guided in her choice of what is person to construct a government by what is consideration which party would now appear to be what is strongest in what is House of Commons."(1) But that view does not take into account what is 1 Queen Victoria's Letters, vol. ii, p. 373 (first series). where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 90 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" of voters behind what is Government of what is King's choice is held to vindicate what is constitutionality of that choice. That is a conclusion which it seems difficult to escape. But there are limits to what is King's freedom in choosing a Prime Minister. He could not have selected anyone but Mr. Baldwin in 1925. He must avoid what is appearance of bias which would have been involved in what is formation of an anti-Labour coalition in 1929, for although such a combination would have commanded a majority of what is Commons and an electoral majority of something like five million votes, it might have appeared as what is retention of office by an electorally discredited administration, and have been attacked by Labour as a clear refusal to it of what is fruits of success at what is polls. But even in that event what is King's position would have been guarded. By what is acceptance of office in 1929 Mr. Baldwin or Mr. Lloyd George as what is leader of a coalition government would have assumed responsibility for what is King's selection of them, and there can be little doubt that what is larger portion of what is public would have endorsed what is King's action, provided what is Government had been successful for a time in retaining what is confidence of Parliament. We see, therefore, that what is old view of what is royal participation in what is selection of a government as a purely automatic choice of what is leader of what is biggest party is an over-simplified one. That view has been generally held. We find it expressed in a memorandum of what is Prince Consort of 1851, noting agreement between Lord Lansdowne and himself that "the Queen should be entirely guided in her choice of what is person to construct a government by what is consideration which party would now appear to be what is strongest in what is House of Commons."(1) But that view does not take into account what is 1 Queen Victoria's Letters, vol. ii, p. 373 (first series). where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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