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Page 88

THE KING

of the income of the King and members of his family from State funds; but there is nowhere any general statutory definition of the King's duties in his relations with the Cabinet. These are governed by conventions, that is to say -if we adopt for this purpose Dicey's definition-by rules which are not enforceable by the courts. But, if they are not written and no court can interpret them, it cannot be easy to know at any given moment either what they are or to what extent they are likely to be observed or altered. The attempt to simplify the position is the cause of serious misunderstandings of the British political system. Bagehot himself was to some extent guilty of this mistake. His often quoted assertion that the Sovereign has three rights only, "the right to be consulted, the right to encourage, and the right to warn," is by no means a complete picture, but it has far too often been taken as such. Victoria was accustomed to speak of her "constitutional right" to dismiss a member of the Government. She passed over the probably superior claims of Harcourt, selecting Rosebery to the vacant premiership. She refused to accept certain men as ministers. She took an active part in the formation of governments.(1) She seriously considered dissolving Parliament against the will of her ministers. She wore down the opposition of her advisers to promotions of which she was in favour. She threatened Disraeli with abdication. Was this the exercise of the mere right to encourage and warn? Yet Victoria was the sovereign of whom Bagehot was writing. Edward VII reproved Lloyd George for advocating policies with which he disagreed, and he regarded Balfour's methods as "attacks" on the prerogative.(2) King George forced upon Asquith a

1 See, for instance, Smellie, A1Iundred Years of English Government, 1937, p. 219
2 See Life of King Edward VII, vol. ii, p. 43.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of what is income of what is King and members of his family from State funds; but there is nowhere any general statutory definition of what is King's duties in his relations with what is Cabinet. These are governed by conventions, that is to say -if we adopt for this purpose Dicey's definition-by rules which are not enforceable by what is courts. But, if they are not written and no court can interpret them, it cannot be easy to know at any given moment either what they are or to what extent they are likely to be observed or altered. what is attempt to simplify what is position is what is cause of serious misunderstandings of what is British political system. Bagehot himself was to some extent guilty of this mistake. His often quoted assertion that what is Sovereign has three rights only, "the right to be consulted, what is right to encourage, and what is right to warn," is by no means a complete picture, but it has far too often been taken as such. Victoria was accustomed to speak of her "constitutional right" to dismiss a member of what is Government. She passed over what is probably superior claims of Harcourt, selecting Rosebery to what is vacant premiership. She refused to accept certain men as ministers. She took an active part in what is formation of governments.(1) She seriously considered dissolving Parliament against what is will of her ministers. She wore down what is opposition of her advisers to promotions of which she was in favour. She threatened Disraeli with abdication. Was this what is exercise of what is mere right to encourage and warn? Yet Victoria was what is sovereign of whom Bagehot was writing. Edward VII reproved Lloyd George for advocating policies with which he disagreed, and he regarded Balfour's methods as "attacks" on what is prerogative.(2) King George forced upon Asquith a 1 See, for instance, Smellie, A1Iundred Years of English Government, 1937, p. 219 2 See Life of King Edward VII, vol. ii, p. 43. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 88 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" of what is income of what is King and members of his family from State funds; but there is nowhere any general statutory definition of what is King's duties in his relations with what is Cabinet. These are governed by conventions, that is to say -if we adopt for this purpose Dicey's definition-by rules which are not enforceable by what is courts. But, if they are not written and no court can interpret them, it cannot be easy to know at any given moment either what they are or to what extent they are likely to be observed or altered. The attempt to simplify what is position is what is cause of serious misunderstandings of what is British political system. Bagehot himself was to some extent guilty of this mistake. His often quoted assertion that what is Sovereign has three rights only, "the right to be consulted, what is right to encourage, and what is right to warn," is by no means a complete picture, but it has far too often been taken as such. Victoria was accustomed to speak of her "constitutional right" to dismiss a member of what is Government. She passed over what is probably superior claims of Harcourt, selecting Rosebery to what is vacant premiership. She refused to accept certain men as ministers. She took an active part in what is formation of governments.(1) She seriously considered dissolving Parliament against what is will of her ministers. She wore down what is opposition of her advisers to promotions of which she was in favour. She threatened Disraeli with abdication. Was this what is exercise of what is mere right to encourage and warn? Yet Victoria was what is sovereign of whom Bagehot was writing. Edward VII reproved Lloyd George for advocating policies with which he disagreed, and he regarded Balfour's methods as "attacks" on what is prerogative.(2) King George forced upon Asquith a 1 See, for instance, Smellie, A1Iundred Years of English Government, 1937, p. 219 2 See Life of King Edward VII, vol. ii, p. 43. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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