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Page 87

THE KING

It is significant that Sir Sidney Lee should have found a difficulty in drawing the line between constitutional and personal monarchy. As official biographer of Edward VII he had the fullest opportunity of examining the documents. Yet he found that the dividing line "is more shadowy than is sometimes thought."(1) Every student of politics is familiar with the contrast made between the Sovereign's formal powers which are immense and his real powers which are said to be unimportant. It has generally been accepted that the Sovereign can do nothing more than encourage and warn his ministers. He may make suggestions, deliver criticisms, tender advice, but the decision rests with the political leaders in power and theirs is the responsibility. He may choose to call for one politician rather than another to form a government, but on acceptance the responsibility devolves upon the new Prime Minister and the majority of the House of Commons which supports him. The powers of the Crown have been transferred from the King to the Cabinet, but the King's approval is still necessary before they can be exercised. That approval may take the form of a signature, of mere presence in the Council Chamber, or of handing over the seals of office. Without that approval the legal basis of government would largely vanish, and therefore the principle that it must be given is fundamental.
Yet the King's obligation to give that approval has never been laid down by law. There is, in the Act of Settlement, a statute regulating the succession to the Crown; in the Royal Marriages Act a law limiting the freedom of members of the royal family; in the Civil List Act, 1937, a legal fixing

1 Life of King Edward YII, vol. ii, p. 35.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE It is significant that Sir Sidney Lee should have found a difficulty in drawing what is line between constitutional and personal monarchy. As official biographer of Edward VII he had what is fullest opportunity of examining what is documents. Yet he found that what is dividing line "is more shadowy than is sometimes thought."(1) Every student of politics is familiar with what is contrast made between what is Sovereign's formal powers which are immense and his real powers which are said to be unimportant. It has generally been accepted that what is Sovereign can do nothing more than encourage and warn his ministers. He may make suggestions, deliver criticisms, tender advice, but what is decision rests with what is political leaders in power and theirs is what is responsibility. He may choose to call for one politician rather than another to form a government, but on acceptance what is responsibility devolves upon what is new Prime Minister and what is majority of what is House of Commons which supports him. what is powers of what is Crown have been transferred from what is King to what is Cabinet, but what is King's approval is still necessary before they can be exercised. That approval may take what is form of a signature, of mere presence in what is Council Chamber, or of handing over what is seals of office. Without that approval what is legal basis of government would largely vanish, and therefore what is principle that it must be given is fundamental. Yet what is King's obligation to give that approval has never been laid down by law. There is, in what is Act of Settlement, a statute regulating what is succession to what is Crown; in what is Royal Marriages Act a law limiting what is freedom of members of what is royal family; in what is Civil List Act, 1937, a legal fixing 1 Life of King Edward YII, vol. ii, p. 35. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 87 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" It is significant that Sir Sidney Lee should have found a difficulty in drawing what is line between constitutional and personal monarchy. As official biographer of Edward VII he had what is fullest opportunity of examining what is documents. Yet he found that what is dividing line "is more shadowy than is sometimes thought."(1) Every student of politics is familiar with the contrast made between what is Sovereign's formal powers which are immense and his real powers which are said to be unimportant. It has generally been accepted that what is Sovereign can do nothing more than encourage and warn his ministers. He may make suggestions, deliver criticisms, tender advice, but what is decision rests with what is political leaders in power and theirs is what is responsibility. He may choose to call for one politician rather than another to form a government, but on acceptance what is responsibility devolves upon what is new Prime Minister and what is majority of what is House of Commons which supports him. The powers of what is Crown have been transferred from what is King to the Cabinet, but what is King's approval is still necessary before they can be exercised. That approval may take what is form of a signature, of mere presence in what is Council Chamber, or of handing over the seals of office. Without that approval what is legal basis of government would largely vanish, and therefore what is principle that it must be given is fundamental. Yet what is King's obligation to give that approval has never been laid down by law. There is, in what is Act of Settlement, a statute regulating what is succession to what is Crown; in what is Royal Marriages Act a law limiting what is freedom of members of what is royal family; in what is Civil List Act, 1937, a legal fixing 1 Life of King Edward YII, vol. ii, p. 35. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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