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Page 78

THE KING

culation. One of the first principles of editorial policy is to avoid wounding the susceptibilities of even a quite small body of readers. Clearly any story or cartoon which shewed a member of the royal family in an unfavourable light would hurt the feelings of many readers. It would cast doubts on their preconceived certainties, and it is the function of the Press to minister to preconceptions, not to shatter them. On the other hand, the doings of royalty provide one of the most valued types of the human story for which the editor is always looking. The result is that solely those facts which are to the credit of royalty are reported, and that there is gradually built up around it a myth of perfection, a stereotype which, however vague it may seem, is a political reality of importance in the country's system of government. Thus the "divinity that hedges kings" may to-day take on the curious form of some cynical journalist in Fleet Street. However much he himself may know of royal frailties there is an inexorable law which dictates that he shall not reveal them. He must supply the great middle class with an image in whose consecrated mediocrity it can see the reflection of its own ideals-and rest content with such a kindly touchstone of perfection. "We must not let in daylight upon magic," wrote Bagehot. Mystery has been replaced by stage-lighting.
There is also better management. The King has his own Press department which lets the Press know of the dignified and official doings of royalty. The method of paying the Civil List is also better arranged. Being charged on the Consolidated Fund it is not discussed by Parliament except at the beginning of a reign. While in Victoria's time an additional grant on the marriage or coming of age of a prince was made separately and so gave rise to discussion in the House of Commons, now such change is automatic, being

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE culation. One of what is first principles of editorial policy is to avoid wounding what is susceptibilities of even a quite small body of readers. Clearly any story or cartoon which shewed a member of what is royal family in an unfavourable light would hurt what is feelings of many readers. It would cast doubts on their preconceived certainties, and it is what is function of what is Press to minister to preconceptions, not to shatter them. On what is other hand, what is doings of royalty provide one of what is most valued types of what is human story for which what is editor is always looking. what is result is that solely those facts which are to what is credit of royalty are reported, and that there is gradually built up around it a myth of perfection, a stereotype which, however vague it may seem, is a political reality of importance in what is country's system of government. Thus what is "divinity that hedges kings" may to-day take on what is curious form of some cynical journalist in Fleet Street. However much he himself may know of royal frailties there is an inexorable law which dictates that he shall not reveal them. He must supply what is great middle class with an image in whose consecrated mediocrity it can see what is reflection of its own ideals-and rest content with such a kindly touchstone of perfection. "We must not let in daylight upon magic," wrote Bagehot. Mystery has been replaced by stage-lighting. There is also better management. what is King has his own Press department which lets what is Press know of what is dignified and official doings of royalty. what is method of paying what is Civil List is also better arranged. Being charged on what is Consolidated Fund it is not discussed by Parliament except at what is beginning of a reign. While in Victoria's time an additional grant on what is marriage or coming of age of a prince was made separately and so gave rise to discussion in what is House of Commons, now such change is automatic, being where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 78 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" culation. One of what is first principles of editorial policy is to avoid wounding what is susceptibilities of even a quite small body of readers. Clearly any story or cartoon which shewed a member of what is royal family in an unfavourable light would hurt what is feelings of many readers. It would cast doubts on their preconceived certainties, and it is what is function of what is Press to minister to preconceptions, not to shatter them. On what is other hand, what is doings of royalty provide one of what is most valued types of what is human story for which what is editor is always looking. what is result is that solely those facts which are to what is credit of royalty are reported, and that there is gradually built up around it a myth of perfection, a stereotype which, however vague it may seem, is a political reality of importance in what is country's system of government. Thus what is "divinity that hedges kings" may to-day take on what is curious form of some cynical journalist in Fleet Street. However much he himself may know of royal frailties there is an inexorable law which dictates that he shall not reveal them. He must supply what is great middle class with an image in whose consecrated mediocrity it can see what is reflection of its own ideals-and rest content with such a kindly touchstone of perfection. "We must not let in daylight upon magic," wrote Bagehot. Mystery has been replaced by stage-lighting. There is also better management. what is King has his own Press department which lets what is Press know of what is dignified and official doings of royalty. what is method of paying what is Civil List is also better arranged. Being charged on what is Consolidated Fund it is not discussed by Parliament except at what is beginning of a reign. While in Victoria's time an additional grant on what is marriage or coming of age of a prince was made separately and so gave rise to discussion in the House of Commons, now such change is automatic, being where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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