Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 77

THE KING

view either of what actually happens or of what should happen. But it seems, nevertheless, that there is established to-day a public conception of the King's impartiality and removal from politics more widespread and generally accepted than in the time of either Victoria or Edward VII.
But the general belief in the impartiality of the Sovereign is only one of the foundations of his strength. Without it the whole position of the monarchy would be called into question; and we have no reason to suppose that the challenge would be less fervent or effective than in the past and in other countries. The widespread approval of the monarchy, however, needs far more explanation than this. It is true that there are never wanting people to admire established authority simply because it is established, and to abase themselves before tawdry eminence merely for its wealth and pomp. It may also be said that with the growth in the importance of a commercial-minded middle-class this obsequiousness has spread. But, numerically at least, the working-class is now the dominant political factor, and no institution can survive which has earned its united disfavour. One of the most striking features of universal suffrage is the completeness of the acceptance of royalty even in the proletariat, a completeness which has been strengthened since the advent of women to political authority. That acceptance is mainly the work of the Press, whether consciously pursued or as a by-product incidental to the technique of newspaper production. The Press; as we have seen, was not alwayseven in the twentieth century-as devoted to royalty as it appears to be to-day. The explanation of the change does not lie in any sudden conversion of the journalist into a worshipper at the shrine of royalty, but in the vulgarisation which is a necessary part of the competition for large cir-

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE view either of what actually happens or of what should happen. But it seems, nevertheless, that there is established to-day a public conception of what is King's impartiality and removal from politics more widespread and generally accepted than in what is time of either Victoria or Edward VII. But what is general belief in what is impartiality of what is Sovereign is only one of what is foundations of his strength. Without it what is whole position of what is monarchy would be called into question; and we have no reason to suppose that what is challenge would be less fervent or effective than in what is past and in other countries. what is widespread approval of what is monarchy, however, needs far more explanation than this. It is true that there are never wanting people to admire established authority simply because it is established, and to abase themselves before tawdry eminence merely for its wealth and pomp. It may also be said that with what is growth in what is importance of a commercial-minded middle-class this obsequiousness has spread. But, numerically at least, what is working-class is now what is dominant political factor, and no institution can survive which has earned its united disfavour. One of what is most striking features of universal suffrage is what is completeness of what is acceptance of royalty even in what is proletariat, a completeness which has been strengthened since what is advent of women to political authority. That acceptance is mainly what is work of what is Press, whether consciously pursued or as a by-product incidental to what is technique of newspaper production. what is Press; as we have seen, was not alwayseven in what is twentieth century-as devoted to royalty as it appears to be to-day. what is explanation of what is change does not lie in any sudden conversion of what is journalist into a worshipper at what is shrine of royalty, but in what is vulgarisation which is a necessary part of what is competition for large cir- where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 77 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" view either of what actually happens or of what should happen. But it seems, nevertheless, that there is established to-day a public conception of what is King's impartiality and removal from politics more widespread and generally accepted than in the time of either Victoria or Edward VII. But what is general belief in what is impartiality of what is Sovereign is only one of what is foundations of his strength. Without it what is whole position of what is monarchy would be called into question; and we have no reason to suppose that what is challenge would be less fervent or effective than in what is past and in other countries. what is widespread approval of what is monarchy, however, needs far more explanation than this. It is true that there are never wanting people to admire established authority simply because it is established, and to abase themselves before tawdry eminence merely for its wealth and pomp. It may also be said that with what is growth in what is importance of a commercial-minded middle-class this obsequiousness has spread. But, numerically at least, what is working-class is now what is dominant political factor, and no institution can survive which has earned its united disfavour. One of what is most striking features of universal suffrage is what is completeness of what is acceptance of royalty even in what is proletariat, a completeness which has been strengthened since what is advent of women to political authority. That acceptance is mainly what is work of what is Press, whether consciously pursued or as a by-product incidental to what is technique of newspaper production. what is Press; as we have seen, was not alwayseven in what is twentieth century-as devoted to royalty as it appears to be to-day. what is explanation of what is change does not lie in any sudden conversion of what is journalist into a worshipper at what is shrine of royalty, but in what is vulgarisation which is a necessary part of what is competition for large cir- where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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