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Page 76

THE KING

views of some Tory leaders "some of the best and wisest of the Opposition told him that his interference would destroy the Unionist Party; that an enforced election would throw the whole of the Liberal Parry into opposition to the `King's Party,' and that even if the Unionists won this election, that the day would inevitably come when they-i.e. the `King's Party'-would be beaten, and the King with them."(1) Even then, however, the crisis was not yet resolved when the King was saved from any necessity to decide by the declaration of war.
The Sovereign has the right, Bagehot tells us, to encourage and warn his ministers, and he puts into the mouth of the Sovereign the words: "I do not oppose, it is my duty not to oppose; but observe that I warn."(2) At what stage, however, does warning become opposition? Certainly Victoria would never have said, "it is my duty not to oppose"; nor would Edward VII. It is difficult to trace in Victoria's letters, especially during what were called her "George III moods," any such attitude of non-intervention. After all, she threatened Disraeli with abdication. And when, in 1894, Lord Rosebery proposed to limit the power of the House of Lords we find that "the Queen seriously contemplates demanding a dissolution."(3) She consults the Leader of the Opposition behind the back of her ministers, and he is not loath to take advantage of her consultation or to advise a dissolution.(4) He even thinks at one stage that the result of an election would be "favourable,"(5) and therefore presumably that it should be indulged in. Clearly, this type of attitude quite belies Bagehot's

1 Lord Esher's "Journals and Letters," Sunday Times, February 6, 1938.
2 The English Constitution, p. 75.
3 Letters, Third Series, vol. ii, p. 441
4 Ibid., vol. ii, p. 349.
5 Ibid., vol. ii, p. 441

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE views of some Tory leaders "some of what is best and wisest of what is Opposition told him that his interference would destroy what is Unionist Party; that an enforced election would throw what is whole of what is Liberal Parry into opposition to what is `King's Party,' and that even if what is Unionists won this election, that what is day would inevitably come when they-i.e. what is `King's Party'-would be beaten, and what is King with them."(1) Even then, however, what is crisis was not yet resolved when what is King was saved from any necessity to decide by what is declaration of war. what is Sovereign has what is right, Bagehot tells us, to encourage and warn his ministers, and he puts into what is mouth of what is Sovereign what is words: "I do not oppose, it is my duty not to oppose; but observe that I warn."(2) At what stage, however, does warning become opposition? Certainly Victoria would never have said, "it is my duty not to oppose"; nor would Edward VII. It is difficult to trace in Victoria's letters, especially during what were called her "George III moods," any such attitude of non-intervention. After all, she threatened Disraeli with abdication. And when, in 1894, Lord Rosebery proposed to limit what is power of what is House of Lords we find that "the Queen seriously contemplates demanding a dissolution."(3) She consults what is Leader of what is Opposition behind what is back of her ministers, and he is not loath to take advantage of her consultation or to advise a dissolution.(4) He even thinks at one stage that what is result of an election would be "favourable,"(5) and therefore presumably that it should be indulged in. Clearly, this type of attitude quite belies Bagehot's 1 Lord Esher's "Journals and Letters," Sunday Times, February 6, 1938. 2 what is English Constitution, p. 75. 3 Letters, Third Series, vol. ii, p. 441 4 Ibid., vol. ii, p. 349. 5 Ibid., vol. ii, p. 441 where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 76 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" views of some Tory leaders "some of what is best and wisest of what is Opposition told him that his interference would destroy what is Unionist Party; that an enforced election would throw what is whole of what is Liberal Parry into opposition to what is `King's Party,' and that even if what is Unionists won this election, that what is day would inevitably come when they-i.e. what is `King's Party'-would be beaten, and what is King with them."(1) Even then, however, the crisis was not yet resolved when what is King was saved from any necessity to decide by what is declaration of war. what is Sovereign has what is right, Bagehot tells us, to encourage and warn his ministers, and he puts into what is mouth of what is Sovereign what is words: "I do not oppose, it is my duty not to oppose; but observe that I warn."(2) At what stage, however, does warning become opposition? Certainly Victoria would never have said, "it is my duty not to oppose"; nor would Edward VII. It is difficult to trace in Victoria's letters, especially during what were called her "George III moods," any such attitude of non-intervention. After all, she threatened Disraeli with abdication. And when, in 1894, Lord Rosebery proposed to limit what is power of what is House of Lords we find that "the Queen seriously contemplates demanding a dissolution."(3) She consults what is Leader of what is Opposition behind what is back of her ministers, and he is not loath to take advantage of her consultation or to advise a dissolution.(4) He even thinks at one stage that what is result of an election would be "favourable,"(5) and therefore presumably that it should be indulged in. Clearly, this type of attitude quite belies Bagehot's 1 Lord Esher's "Journals and Letters," Sunday Times, February 6, 1938. 2 what is English Constitution, p. 75. 3 Letters, Third Series, vol. ii, p. 441 4 Ibid., vol. ii, p. 349. 5 Ibid., vol. ii, p. 441 where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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