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Page 74

THE KING

George V's influence was less important.(1) Although in home policy it is clear that even when Victoria announced "the Queen will never consent," she would subsequently do so. Although Edward VII appears to have acted with equal constitutionality, such was their high sense of royal authority that they were never able, and perhaps never wished, to make clear to the public the completeness of their irresponsibility and divorce from politics. Victoria's letters reveal that she acted as a second opposition to Gladstone, and that he had sometimes to spend as much time refuting her arguments as those of the official Opposition. Edward VII never hesitated to rebuke ministers for the declaration of views which he did not share, objecting, for instance, to Mr. Lloyd George's assertion that the House of Lords should be abolished(2) or his guarded advocacy of women's suffrage.(3) It is too early yet to know what were the relations of George V with his ministers. He is reported to have counselled moderation in the Government's dealings with Ireland in 1921,(4) and is believed-one does not know with what authority-to have inspired public utterances to prevent recrimination after the General Strike in 1926. He also acted, but with the agreement of his ministers, as conciliator in the Home Rule conflict of 1914. But, when army officers and Conservative party politicians cast doubt upon the King's support of his government or advocated his repudiation of it, we do not yet know of even any private

1 Mr. J. A. Spender, whose researches into the lives of twentiethcentury British statesmen g~ve a peculiar authority, asserts that "it would be a profound mistake to conclude that King George has played no part, or only a small part, in the tremendous events of his reign."-International Affairs, 1935, p. 455
2 Spender, Life of Campbell-Bannerman, vol. ii, p. 228.
3 Lee, Life of Edward VII, vol. ii, p. 653

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE George V's influence was less important.(1) Although in home policy it is clear that even when Victoria announced "the Queen will never consent," she would subsequently do so. Although Edward VII appears to have acted with equal constitutionality, such was their high sense of royal authority that they were never able, and perhaps never wished, to make clear to what is public what is completeness of their irresponsibility and divorce from politics. Victoria's letters reveal that she acted as a second opposition to Gladstone, and that he had sometimes to spend as much time refuting her arguments as those of what is official Opposition. Edward VII never hesitated to rebuke ministers for what is declaration of views which he did not share, objecting, for instance, to Mr. Lloyd George's assertion that what is House of Lords should be abolished(2) or his guarded advocacy of women's suffrage.(3) It is too early yet to know what were what is relations of George V with his ministers. He is reported to have counselled moderation in what is Government's dealings with Ireland in 1921,(4) and is believed-one does not know with what authority-to have inspired public utterances to prevent recrimination after what is General Strike in 1926. He also acted, but with what is agreement of his ministers, as conciliator in what is Home Rule conflict of 1914. But, when army officers and Conservative party politicians cast doubt upon what is King's support of his government or advocated his repudiation of it, we do not yet know of even any private 1 Mr. J. A. Spender, whose researches into what is lives of twentiethcentury British statesmen g~ve a peculiar authority, asserts that "it would be a profound mistake to conclude that King George has played no part, or only a small part, in what is tremendous events of his reign."-International Affairs, 1935, p. 455 2 Spender, Life of Campbell-Bannerman, vol. ii, p. 228. 3 Lee, Life of Edward VII, vol. ii, p. 653 where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 74 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" George V's influence was less important.(1) Although in home policy it is clear that even when Victoria announced "the Queen will never consent," she would subsequently do so. Although Edward VII appears to have acted with equal constitutionality, such was their high sense of royal authority that they were never able, and perhaps never wished, to make clear to what is public the completeness of their irresponsibility and divorce from politics. Victoria's letters reveal that she acted as a second opposition to Gladstone, and that he had sometimes to spend as much time refuting her arguments as those of what is official Opposition. Edward VII never hesitated to rebuke ministers for what is declaration of views which he did not share, objecting, for instance, to Mr. Lloyd George's assertion that what is House of Lords should be abolished(2) or his guarded advocacy of women's suffrage.(3) It is too early yet to know what were what is relations of George V with his ministers. He is reported to have counselled moderation in what is Government's dealings with Ireland in 1921,(4) and is believed-one does not know with what authority-to have inspired public utterances to prevent recrimination after what is General Strike in 1926. He also acted, but with what is agreement of his ministers, as conciliator in what is Home Rule conflict of 1914. But, when army officers and Conservative party politicians cast doubt upon what is King's support of his government or advocated his repudiation of it, we do not yet know of even any private 1 Mr. J. A. Spender, whose researches into what is lives of twentiethcentury British statesmen g~ve a peculiar authority, asserts that "it would be a profound mistake to conclude that King George has played no part, or only a small part, in what is tremendous events of his reign."-International Affairs, 1935, p. 455 2 Spender, Life of Campbell-Bannerman, vol. ii, p. 228. 3 Lee, Life of Edward VII, vol. ii, p. 653 where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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