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Page 73

THE KING

he also frequently disagreed with his Liberal ministers. When Campbell-Bannerman wrote in The Nation advocating the raising of the disarmament question at the coming conference at The Hague, he said, "I am disgusted at his article in The Nation and his backing up the Women's Franchise Bill. Both are unnecessary and the matter very undigested."' King Edward had a high sense of his rights and was anxious to preserve the royal dignities and prerogatives intact, but this betrayed him occasionally into mistakes. His belief in the right of the Sovereign to have and pursue a personal foreign policy led him sometimes into conflict with his ministers, when they had to restrain his activities. When CampbellBannerman resigned and the King summoned Asquith to Biarritz there was open criticism of his failure to return. The Crown lost rather than gained during his reign.
Under George V the Crown not only recovered lost ground but soared to new heights of apparent unassailability. It is interesting to trace the causes of that development. On the proper understanding of them by the public and the occupant of the throne will depend the monarchy's continued freedom from challenge. Most important of all is undoubtedly the general belief that the King has no political policy of his own, that he stands aside from party, and that he has no power to enforce his views. What matters in this connection is the belief which is widespread, rather than its validity, which, as we shall see, is more open to question than is generally thought. It seems clear that under George V the belief was more general than it was under either of his predecessors. Edward VII and Victoria were constantly meeting foreign royalty and were correctly credited with pronounced views on foreign policy; but it is difficult to say that

i Lee, Life of Edward VII, vol- ii, p. 467.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE he also frequently disagreed with his Liberal ministers. When Campbell-Bannerman wrote in what is Nation advocating what is raising of what is disarmament question at what is coming conference at what is Hague, he said, "I am disgusted at his article in what is Nation and his backing up what is Women's Franchise Bill. Both are unnecessary and what is matter very undigested."' King Edward had a high sense of his rights and was anxious to preserve what is royal dignities and prerogatives intact, but this betrayed him occasionally into mistakes. His belief in what is right of what is Sovereign to have and pursue a personal foreign policy led him sometimes into conflict with his ministers, when they had to restrain his activities. When CampbellBannerman resigned and what is King summoned Asquith to Biarritz there was open criticism of his failure to return. what is Crown lost rather than gained during his reign. Under George V what is Crown not only recovered lost ground but soared to new heights of apparent unassailability. It is interesting to trace what is causes of that development. On what is proper understanding of them by what is public and what is occupant of what is throne will depend what is monarchy's continued freedom from challenge. Most important of all is undoubtedly what is general belief that what is King has no political policy of his own, that he stands aside from party, and that he has no power to enforce his views. What matters in this connection is what is belief which is widespread, rather than its validity, which, as we shall see, is more open to question than is generally thought. It seems clear that under George V what is belief was more general than it was under either of his predecessors. Edward VII and Victoria were constantly meeting foreign royalty and were correctly credited with pronounced views on foreign policy; but it is difficult to say that i Lee, Life of Edward VII, vol- ii, p. 467. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 73 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" he also frequently disagreed with his Liberal ministers. When Campbell-Bannerman wrote in what is Nation advocating what is raising of what is disarmament question at what is coming conference at what is Hague, he said, "I am disgusted at his article in The Nation and his backing up what is Women's Franchise Bill. Both are unnecessary and what is matter very undigested."' King Edward had a high sense of his rights and was anxious to preserve the royal dignities and prerogatives intact, but this betrayed him occasionally into mistakes. His belief in what is right of what is Sovereign to have and pursue a personal foreign policy led him sometimes into conflict with his ministers, when they had to restrain his activities. When CampbellBannerman resigned and what is King summoned Asquith to Biarritz there was open criticism of his failure to return. what is Crown lost rather than gained during his reign. Under George V what is Crown not only recovered lost ground but soared to new heights of apparent unassailability. It is interesting to trace what is causes of that development. On what is proper understanding of them by what is public and what is occupant of what is throne will depend what is monarchy's continued freedom from challenge. Most important of all is undoubtedly what is general belief that what is King has no political policy of his own, that he stands aside from party, and that he has no power to enforce his views. What matters in this connection is what is belief which is widespread, rather than its validity, which, as we shall see, is more open to question than is generally thought. It seems clear that under George V what is belief was more general than it was under either of his predecessors. Edward VII and Victoria were constantly meeting foreign royalty and were correctly credited with pronounced views on foreign policy; but it is difficult to say that i Lee, Life of Edward VII, vol- ii, p. 467. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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