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Page 72

THE KING

But behind this symbol was a woman increasingly out of touch with the realities of her day and singularly unfitted to understand the movements of liberalism and social reform. We must agree with Lytton Strachey when he says of her that "the vast changes which, out of the England of 1837, had produced the England of 1897, seemed scarcely to have touched the Queen. The immense industrial development of the period ... meant little indeed to Victoria. The amazing scientific movement ... left Victoria perfectly cold."(1) To her a Conservative Government was in the natural order of things, a Liberal one was merely a temporary and highly annoying lapse into abnormality. "Mr. CampbellBannerman," wrote the Queen, "forgets the danger of increasing the power of the House of Commons and having no force to resist the subversive measures of the so-called Liberals but better called destructives."(2) And in 1892 we find her writing in agitation from Balmoral after some slight insubordination in the Ist Life Guards: "Something must be done to prevent the Non-commissioned Officers from getting demoralised by Socialists."(3) If the Queen had been Whig at the beginning of her reign there was no doubt that she was High Tory at the end.
Edward VII wished, we are told, to check the tendency of the Court to become frankly partisan.(4) But his personal views were hardly less definite. Like his mother he was opposed to Woman's Suffrage and House of Lords Reform. If he was annoyed by Balfour's "attacks" on the prerogative,(5)

1 Queen Victoria, p. 258.
2 Spender, Life of Campbell-Bannerman, 1923, vol- i, p. 171.
3 Letters, Third Series, ii, 170
4 Spen.:er, Life of Campbell-Bannerman, vol. ii, p. 227.
5 Ibid., vol. ii, p. 43.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE But behind this symbol was a woman increasingly out of touch with what is realities of her day and singularly unfitted to understand what is movements of liberalism and social reform. We must agree with Lytton Strachey when he says of her that "the vast changes which, out of what is England of 1837, had produced what is England of 1897, seemed scarcely to have touched what is Queen. what is immense industrial development of what is period ... meant little indeed to Victoria. what is amazing scientific movement ... left Victoria perfectly cold."(1) To her a Conservative Government was in what is natural order of things, a Liberal one was merely a temporary and highly annoying lapse into abnormality. "Mr. CampbellBannerman," wrote what is Queen, "forgets what is danger of increasing what is power of what is House of Commons and having no force to resist what is subversive measures of what is so-called Liberals but better called destructives."(2) And in 1892 we find her writing in agitation from Balmoral after some slight insubordination in what is Ist Life Guards: "Something must be done to prevent what is Non-commissioned Officers from getting demoralised by Socialists."(3) If what is Queen had been Whig at what is beginning of her reign there was no doubt that she was High Tory at what is end. Edward VII wished, we are told, to check what is tendency of what is Court to become frankly partisan.(4) But his personal views were hardly less definite. Like his mother he was opposed to Woman's Suffrage and House of Lords Reform. If he was annoyed by Balfour's "attacks" on what is prerogative,(5) 1 Queen Victoria, p. 258. 2 Spender, Life of Campbell-Bannerman, 1923, vol- i, p. 171. 3 Letters, Third Series, ii, 170 4 Spen.:er, Life of Campbell-Bannerman, vol. ii, p. 227. 5 Ibid., vol. ii, p. 43. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 72 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" But behind this symbol was a woman increasingly out of touch with what is realities of her day and singularly unfitted to understand what is movements of liberalism and social reform. We must agree with Lytton Strachey when he says of her that "the vast changes which, out of what is England of 1837, had produced the England of 1897, seemed scarcely to have touched what is Queen. The immense industrial development of what is period ... meant little indeed to Victoria. what is amazing scientific movement ... left Victoria perfectly cold."(1) To her a Conservative Government was in what is natural order of things, a Liberal one was merely a temporary and highly annoying lapse into abnormality. "Mr. CampbellBannerman," wrote what is Queen, "forgets what is danger of increasing what is power of what is House of Commons and having no force to resist what is subversive measures of what is so-called Liberals but better called destructives."(2) And in 1892 we find her writing in agitation from Balmoral after some slight insubordination in what is Ist Life Guards: "Something must be done to prevent what is Non-commissioned Officers from getting demoralised by Socialists."(3) If what is Queen had been Whig at what is beginning of her reign there was no doubt that she was High Tory at what is end. Edward VII wished, we are told, to check what is tendency of what is Court to become frankly partisan.(4) But his personal views were hardly less definite. Like his mother he was opposed to Woman's Suffrage and House of Lords Reform. If he was annoyed by Balfour's "attacks" on what is prerogative,(5) 1 Queen Victoria, p. 258. 2 Spender, Life of Campbell-Bannerman, 1923, vol- i, p. 171. 3 Letters, Third Series, ii, 170 4 Spen.:er, Life of Campbell-Bannerman, vol. ii, p. 227. 5 Ibid., vol. ii, p. 43. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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