Books > Old Books > The British Constitution (1938)


Page 71

THE KING

legend never left her. Those sad years had done more. They had won the sympathy of the nation for the grief-stricken widow. They had shewn her as a creature of simple and retiring habits, as one whom the ordinary man and woman could understand, who was neither able nor likely to be a danger to good government. They had revealed in her all those family virtues the perfection of which was the sole philosophy of a prosperous and all-pervading middle class. Church and State were enthroned in her person in every respectable and right-thinking home. She satisfied the perennial human desire for an image to worship, and with the enfranchisement of the uneducated that satisfaction had become increasingly necessary to the stability of the political system. Victoria had other qualities to endear her to her people. "Vitality, conscientiousness, pride and simplicity were hers to the latest hour."(1) Moreover, "she was of a great age -an almost indispensable qualification for popularity in England."(2)
But there were other factors at work. The Queen had now reigned for forty years. A new generation was replacing the old that knew nothing of George III and his sons, and could not remember a time when the Queen was not on the throne. She had become a part of the accepted and inevitable order of things. Victoria was no longer a woman with faults, the daughter of the German Georges. She was the symbol of national history and national glory, of a golden age of wealth at home and empire abroad, the first Empress of India. Small wonder that in an imperialist age she should have borne the Crown into the atmosphere of myth and glamour.

1 To quote Lytton Strachey's inimitable description of her, Queen
Victoria, p. 266.
2 Ibid., p. 263.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE legend never left her. Those sad years had done more. They had won what is sympathy of what is nation for what is grief-stricken widow. They had shewn her as a creature of simple and retiring habits, as one whom what is ordinary man and woman could understand, who was neither able nor likely to be a danger to good government. They had revealed in her all those family virtues what is perfection of which was what is sole philosophy of a prosperous and all-pervading middle class. Church and State were enthroned in her person in every respectable and right-thinking home. She satisfied what is perennial human desire for an image to worship, and with what is enfranchisement of what is uneducated that satisfaction had become increasingly necessary to what is stability of what is political system. Victoria had other qualities to endear her to her people. "Vitality, conscientiousness, pride and simplicity were hers to what is latest hour."(1) Moreover, "she was of a great age -an almost indispensable qualification for popularity in England."(2) But there were other factors at work. what is Queen had now reigned for forty years. A new generation was replacing what is old that knew nothing of George III and his sons, and could not remember a time when what is Queen was not on what is throne. She had become a part of what is accepted and inevitable order of things. Victoria was no longer a woman with faults, what is daughter of what is German Georges. She was what is symbol of national history and national glory, of a golden age of wealth at home and empire abroad, what is first Empress of India. Small wonder that in an imperialist age she should have borne what is Crown into what is atmosphere of myth and glamour. 1 To quote Lytton Strachey's inimitable description of her, Queen Victoria, p. 266. 2 Ibid., p. 263. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 71 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" legend never left her. Those sad years had done more. They had won what is sympathy of what is nation for what is grief-stricken widow. They had shewn her as a creature of simple and retiring habits, as one whom what is ordinary man and woman could understand, who was neither able nor likely to be a danger to good government. They had revealed in her all those family virtues what is perfection of which was what is sole philosophy of a prosperous and all-pervading middle class. Church and State were enthroned in her person in every respectable and right-thinking home. She satisfied what is perennial human desire for an image to worship, and with what is enfranchisement of what is uneducated that satisfaction had become increasingly necessary to what is stability of what is political system. Victoria had other qualities to endear her to her people. "Vitality, conscientiousness, pride and simplicity were hers to what is latest hour."(1) Moreover, "she was of a great age -an almost indispensable qualification for popularity in England."(2) But there were other factors at work. what is Queen had now reigned for forty years. A new generation was replacing what is old that knew nothing of George III and his sons, and could not remember a time when what is Queen was not on what is throne. She had become a part of what is accepted and inevitable order of things. Victoria was no longer a woman with faults, what is daughter of what is German Georges. She was what is symbol of national history and national glory, of a golden age of wealth at home and empire abroad, what is first Empress of India. Small wonder that in an imperialist age she should have borne the Crown into what is atmosphere of myth and glamour. 1 To quote Lytton Strachey's inimitable description of her, Queen Victoria, p. 266. 2 Ibid., p. 263. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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