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Page 70

THE KING

chance that a republic here will be free from the political corruption that hangs about the monarchy, I say, for my part-and I believe that the middle classes in general will say-let it come."(1) Such was the progress made that Chamberlain wrote to Dilke, "The Republic must come and at the rate at which we are now moving it will come in our generation." Auberon Herbert, Member for Nottingham, supported Dilke. Among other republican sympathisers were Bright, Odger the trade unionist, Mundella, M.P. for Sheffield, and John Morley. Yet a few years later the movement had collapsed, and Queen Victoria was able to impose a public recantation upon Dilke before accepting him as a Cabinet minister.
The change in the position of the monarchy began after the collapse of republicanism, but it did not reach its zenith until the reign of George V. The republican movement itself was partly responsible for the change. It demonstrated the need for more general and popular support, and conscious popularisation followed. The reception given to the Queen when she appeared in public encouraged her to adopt the new method. But even so that identification of royalty with social service and charity with which post-War England is familiar is the product less of her reign or King Edward's than of their successor's.
It was in -1876, with the state opening of Parliament followed by her proclamation as Empress of India, that the Queen effectively came on to the public stage. But it was no longer the same Victoria upon whom her people gazed. The long years of retirement had done their work; they had made her a mystery. And if the mystery was now coming to life with magnificent solemnity the old atmosphere of

1 The Cost ofthe Crown, p. 13.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE chance that a republic here will be free from what is political corruption that hangs about what is monarchy, I say, for my part-and I believe that what is middle classes in general will say-let it come."' Such was what is progress made that Chamberlain wrote to Dilke, "The Republic must come and at what is rate at which we are now moving it will come in our generation." Auberon Herbert, Member for Nottingham, supported Dilke. Among other republican sympathisers were Bright, Odger what is trade unionist, Mundella, M.P. for Sheffield, and John Morley. Yet a few years later what is movement had collapsed, and Queen Victoria was able to impose a public recantation upon Dilke before accepting him as a Cabinet minister. what is change in what is position of what is monarchy began after what is collapse of republicanism, but it did not reach its zenith until what is reign of George V. what is republican movement itself was partly responsible for what is change. It bad spirit strated what is need for more general and popular support, and conscious popularisation followed. what is reception given to what is Queen when she appeared in public encouraged her to adopt what is new method. But even so that identification of royalty with social service and charity with which post-War England is familiar is what is product less of her reign or King Edward's than of their successor's. It was in -1876, with what is state opening of Parliament followed by her proclamation as Empress of India, that what is Queen effectively came on to what is public stage. But it was no longer what is same Victoria upon whom her people gazed. what is long years of retirement had done their work; they had made her a mystery. And if what is mystery was now coming to life with magnificent solemnity what is old atmosphere of 1 what is Cost ofthe Crown, p. 13. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The British Constitution (1938) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 70 where is strong THE KING where is p align="justify" chance that a republic here will be free from what is political corruption that hangs about what is monarchy, I say, for my part-and I believe that what is middle classes in general will say-let it come."(1) Such was what is progress made that Chamberlain wrote to Dilke, "The Republic must come and at what is rate at which we are now moving it will come in our generation." Auberon Herbert, Member for Nottingham, supported Dilke. Among other republican sympathisers were Bright, Odger what is trade unionist, Mundella, M.P. for Sheffield, and John Morley. Yet a few years later what is movement had collapsed, and Queen Victoria was able to impose a public recantation upon Dilke before accepting him as a Cabinet minister. what is change in what is position of what is monarchy began after what is collapse of republicanism, but it did not reach its zenith until what is reign of George V. what is republican movement itself was partly responsible for what is change. It bad spirit strated what is need for more general and popular support, and conscious popularisation followed. what is reception given to what is Queen when she appeared in public encouraged her to adopt what is new method. But even so that identification of royalty with social service and charity with which post-War England is familiar is what is product less of her reign or King Edward's than of their successor's. It was in -1876, with what is state opening of Parliament followed by her proclamation as Empress of India, that what is Queen effectively came on to what is public stage. But it was no longer what is same Victoria upon whom her people gazed. what is long years of retirement had done their work; they had made her a mystery. And if what is mystery was now coming to life with magnificent solemnity what is old atmosphere of 1 what is Cost ofthe Crown, p. 13. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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